Research Proposal - Police Brutality.doc - Research...

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Research proposal Title: "Police Brutality in America and the infiltration of hate groups among law enforcement department." James Anestin American Public University
1.0 Introduction 1.1 Research background Concerns over the killing of African American males and females by police in recent decades prompts a need for research on the existence of racism in the law enforcement department, and whether police brutality is actually linked to the infiltration of hate groups in the police force (Downs, 2016). While attempts have been made to root out infiltration of hate groups in the police departments, an underlying problem inhibiting such attempts is the paucity of research data on police brutality (Downs, 2016). Therefore, in spite of the ongoing public outrage over police brutality, it has remained a challenge to determine if the existence of hate groups is truly linked to racially-prejudiced policing. Additionally, there are claims among some police departments in the U.S. that the dearth of objective information on police brutality has facilitated the emergent credence that police officers are more disposed to target certain racial groups (Downs, 2016). The blacks comprise just about 13% of the U.S. population yet make nearly 26% of the victims of police brutality. As a result, a young African American is up to 3 times at risk of being a victim of police violence in comparison to their white counterparts (Bleuse, 2016). In early 2019, a number of reports published by The Center for Investigative Reporting indicated a tendency of some police officers to post racist memes on social media, forcing close to 50 police departments in the U.S. This indicates a persistent infiltration of hate groups in the law enforcement departments (O'Carroll, 2019). 1.2 Problem statement & Research significance In 2006, the F.B.I. Counterterrorism Division published a bulletin detailing the growing threat of "white nationalists and skinheads infiltrating" the police departments across the United States (F.B.I. Counterterrorism Division, 2006). The F.B.I report indicated that this could portend significant problems in the near future by encouraging disruption of
investigations against certain ethnic groups and recruitment of other white supremacists. The report was established in the wake of several scandals in the police force, such as an incident in which a neo-Nazi gang in the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department was found to have meted out extreme violence on Latino and African American communities (F.B.I. Counterterrorism Division, 2006). In spite of these earlier warnings, some studies have indicated that more than ten years later, the denial that the problem exists in the police departments has allowed police brutality to persist unabated (Johnson 2019; Bleusa, 2016). As Johnson (2019) has tried to show, only a handful of police departments have acknowledged that police brutality and infiltration of hate groups exist in the police departments, making it difficult to implement effective measures to curtail the seemingly growing epidemic.

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