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Running head: ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY UNIT VIII ESSAY 1 Environmental Technology Unit VIII Essay Columbia Southern University
ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY UNIT VIII ESSAY 2 Environmental Technology Verification Program With the advent of the environmental movement in the 1970s and an increased emphasis on pollution controls and the clean up of existing dump sites, it was only logical that innovative advances would bring about both technology and equipment that would assist industry and government regulators in the monitoring, controlling, preventing, and cleaning up of pollution. As technologies and equipment emerged, by 1995 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had established the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to help government regulators and technology end users better understand the abilities and limitations of available environmental technology. Since its inception, the ETV program mission was to develop testing protocols and other means to verify the performance ability of available technologies that had the potential to improve the protection of the public’s health as well as the environment. During its existence, the program evolved into one of the most comprehensive environmental testing programs in the world examining a wide swath of technologies involving a multitude of industries (Ashley et al., 2005). Unfortunately, the program never became self sufficient and was discontinued in 2014. However, over the duration of the program, ETV provided credible data on over 500 environmental technologies, two of which will be discussed below (Environmental Protection Agency, 2014). Technologies evaluated by the ETV program included a wide variety capable of detecting or preventing contaminants in the soil, water, and air. Two important technologies that the ETV program evaluated were those used to monitor ambient ammonia in the air from livestock sources and continuous mercury emissions from gas flues, incinerators, and other similar sources (Ashley et al., 2005).
ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY UNIT VIII ESSAY 3 Livestock feeding operations are a significant source of ammonia from animal manure and urine which is harmful to the environment. Around half of the ammonia generated by animal waste ponds and lagoons at animal feeding operations falls to the ground within 50 miles of those sources, and the other half becomes particulate matter which also has adverse health effects.

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