1. Teaching Aid- Demand and Supply

1. Teaching Aid- Demand and Supply - DEMAND, SUPPLY, AND...

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Unformatted text preview: DEMAND, SUPPLY, AND MARKET EQUILIBRIUM Teaching Fellow: Jefferson A. Arapoc Significance The tools of demand and supply can be applied to a range of important topics such as: evaluating how global weather conditions will affect agricultural production and market prices of agricultural commodities; assessing the impact of government rent control on dormitory space; understanding how taxes, subsidies, and other government policies affect both consumers and producers. The Concept of DEMAND Demand - refers to the various quantities of a good or service that consumers are willing to purchase at alternative prices, ceteris paribus. Conveys both the elements of desire for the commodity and capacity to pay (must be willing and able). Emphasizes the relationship between quantity bought and its price, although there may be other factors that determine how much a consumer wants to purchase. The Law of Demand Asserts that the quantity demanded of a good or service is negatively or inversely related to its own price. When the price increases, less of the good or service will be bought When the price decreases, more of the commodity will be purchased. WHY SO? Two Reasons for the Inverse Relationship Substitution effect When price of a good decreases, the consumer substitutes the lower priced good for the more expensive ones. When price decreases, the consumer's real income (or purchasing power) increases, so he tends to buy more. Income effect P Q Two Reasons for the Inverse Relationship 1. Substitution effect When price of a good increases, the consumer tends to substitute it with the lower priced goods. When price increases, the consumer's purchasing power (or real income) decreases, so he tends to buy less. 2. Income effect P Q 3 Ways of presenting the demand relationship The relationship between quantity purchased and alternative prices may be presented in 3 ways: Demand schedule in tabular form. Demand curve in graphical form Demand function in equation form Demand Schedule TABLE 3.1. Demand Schedule for Denim Pants Price of Denim Pants (in pesos) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Quantity Demanded per month (No. of pairs) 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Demand Curve P 400 Price (in pesos) 300 200 100 D 2 4 6 8 0 Q Quantity Figure 3.1. Demand Curve. The negative slope of the demand curve depicts the inverse relationship between price and quantity demanded. Demand Function Quantity demanded (Q) is expressed as a mathematical function of price (P). The demand function may thus be written as: Qd = a - bP where a is the horizontal intercept of the equation or the quantity demanded when price is zero (-b) is the slope of the function. Example: Qd = 8 - 0.02P Factors Affecting Demand 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Price of the commodity Prices of related commodities (substitutes and complements) Consumer incomes Tastes and preferences Number of consumers Price expectations Change in Quantity Demanded vs. Change in Demand Change in quantity demanded is a movement along the same demand curve, due solely to a change in price, i.e., all other factors held constant. Change in demand is a shift in the entire demand curve (either to the left or to the right) as a result of changes in other factors affecting demand. Change in quantity demanded Price A decrease in price from p1 to p2 brings about an increase in quantity demanded from q1 to q2 It is shown as a movement along the same demand curve p1 p2 D q1 q2 Quantity Change in demand Price An increase in demand means that at the same price such as p1 more will be brought, due to other factors such as increased incomes, increase in number of consumers, etc. It is shown as a shift in the entire demand curve This is a decrease in demand D2 q1 q2 D0 Quantity p1 D1 Change in Demand P P D' D D' D Q Increase in Demand Decrease in Demand Q Other factors affecting demand Income: as income changes, demand a commodity usually changes Normal goods are goods whose demand respond positively to changes in income. Most goods are normal goods. As income increases, more of shoes, TVs, clothes, are bought. Inferior goods are goods whose demand respond negatively to change in income Few but existent. Examples are firewood, "tuyo", "adidas or chicken feet", bicycles, etc. Other factors affecting demand Prices of related commodities in consumption: Substitutes are goods that are substitutable with each other (not necessarily perfect). Examples are coffee and tea, Coke and Pepsi, beer and ginebra. When the price of a substitute increases, quantity bought of a good increases. --- PyE Qx E (direct relationship) ~ ~ Complements are goods that are used or consumed together. Examples are coffee and sugar, bread and butter, tennis rackets and tennis balls. When the price of a complement increases, quantity bought of a good decreases. --- PyE QxE (inverse relationship) ~ ~ Other factors affecting demand Consumer tastes and preferences: When consumer tastes shift towards a particular good, greater amounts of a good are demanded at each price. Example: consumers preference for drinking mineral water increases so its demand curve will shift rightward. If consumer preferences change away from a good, its demand will decrease; at every possible price, less of the good is demanded than before. Example: the demand for VCDs and VHS tapes decreases due to preference for DVDs. Other factors affecting demand Consumer expectations: Expectations about future prices and income affect our current demand for many goods and services. If we expect prices of dried fish to increase with coming of the rainy season, we might stock up on the good to avoid the expected price increase. Thus, current demand for dried fish might increase those who expect to lose their jobs due to bad economic conditions, will reduce their demand for a variety of goods in the current period. Other factors affecting demand Number of Consumers: affects the total demand for a good. Total demand is also known as market demand. It is the summation of the individual demand of all consumers An increase in the number of consumers shifts the market demand curve to the right Example: demand for housing and transportation increases with an increase in population. On the other hand, less consumers will cause the market demand to decrease, resulting in a shift to the left of the entire demand curve. The Concept of SUPPLY Supply - refers to the various quantities of a good or service that producers are willing to sell at alternative prices, ceteris paribus. Obviously, firms are motivated to produce and sell more at higher prices. Emphasizes the relationship between quantity sold of a commodity and its price. However, there are other factors that determine how much a producer would like to produce and sell. The Law of Supply States that the quantity sold of a good or service is positively or directly related to its own price. When the price increases, more of the good or service will be sold When the price decreases, less of the commodity will be purchased. 3 Ways of presenting the supply relationship The relationship between quantity supplied and alternative prices may be presented in 3 ways: Supply schedule in tabular form. Supply curve in graphical form Supply function in equation form Supply Schedule TABLE 3.2. Supply Schedule for Denim Pants Price of Denim Pants (in pesos) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Quantity Supplied per month (No. of pairs) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Supply Curve P 400 S Price (in pesos) 300 200 100 0 2 4 6 8 Q Quantity Figure 3.2. Supply Curve. The positive slope of the supply curve depicts the direct relationship between price and quantity supplied. Supply Function Quantity supplied (Qs) is expressed as a mathematical function of price (P). The supply function may thus be written as: Qs = c + dP where c is the horizontal intercept of the equation or the quantity demanded when price is zero d is the slope of the function. Example: Qs = 0 + 0.02P Change in Quantity Supplied vs. Change in Supply Change in quantity supplied is a movement along the same supply curve, due solely to a change in price, i.e., all other factors held constant. Change in supply is a shift in the entire supply curve (either to the left or to the right) as a result of changes in other factors affecting supply. Change in quantity supplied Price S An increase in price from p1 to p2 results in an increase in quantity supplied from q1 to q2 It is shown as a movement along the same supply curve p2 p1 q1 q2 Quantity Change in supply S2 Price S0 S1 An increase in supply means that at the same price such as p1 more will be sold, due to other factors such as improvement in technology, increase in number of producers, etc. It is shown as a shift in the entire supply curve p1 This is a decrease in supply q1 q2 Quantity Change in Supply P S S' P S' S D' D Q Increase in Supply Decrease in Supply Q Other factors affecting supply There are other factors aside from price that affect the supply schedule. These are 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. resource prices prices of related goods in production technology expectations number of sellers. Other factors affecting supply Resource prices: When prices of inputs to production increase, the supply of the firm's product decreases. Decreases in resource prices, however, translate to an increase in supply. The entire supply curve shifts to the right. Other factors affecting supply Prices of related goods in production: Resources can be employed to produce several alternative goods and services. Examples from agriculture: a piece of farmland can be use to grow rice, corn, or sugarcane. An increase in price of sugarcane may result in decreased supply of rice and corn. farmers can use their land and labor to produce ornamental flowers instead of vegetables. If vegetable prices decrease, the supply of ornamental flowers may increase. Other factors affecting supply Technology: A change in production techniques can lower or raise production costs and affect supply. Improvements in technology shift the supply curve to the right. A cost-saving invention will enable firms to produce and sell more goods than before at any given price. New high yielding crop varieties will increase production on the same amount of land. Other factors affecting supply Producer expectations: When producers expect the price of their product to increase in the future, they may hoard their output for later sale, thus reducing supply in the present period. Thus the supply curve shifts to the left. If firms expect that the price of their product will fall in the near future, supply may increase in the current period as firms try to increase production as well as to dispose of their inventory. Other factors affecting supply Number of sellers: As the number of sellers increases, so will total supply. The market supply is the horizontal summation of the supply schedules of individual producers. As more firms enter the market, more will offered for sale at each possible price, thus shifting the supply curve to the right. Similarly, the supply curve shifts to the left when firms exit the market. Market Equilibrium Market equilibrium is that state in which the quantity that firms want to supply equals the quantity that consumers want to buy. The price that clears the market is called the equilibrium price and the quantity (sold and bought) is called the equilibrium quantity. The market is said to be "at rest" since the equilibrium price and equilibrium quantity will stay at those levels until either demand or supply changes. Market Equilibrium TABLE 3.3. Market for Denim Pants Price of Denim Pants (in pesos) 0 Equilibrium Price=200 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Quantity Demanded per month (No. of pairs) 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Quantity Supplied per month (No. of pairs) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Equilibrium Quantity=4 Market Equilbrium At prices above the equilibrium price, quantity supplied is greater than quantity demanded, resulting in a temporary surplus. In a surplus situation, producers will try to reduce price to entice consumers to buy more denim pants. Actions by both producers and the public will wipe out the temporary surplus At prices below the equilibrium price, consumers desire to buy more denim pants than are available, creating a temporary shortage. Consumers will try to outbid each other, thus pushing up the price. As price rises, firms increase their production while some consumers reduce their purchases. Market Equilibrium P 400 S Surplus Price (in pesos) 300 200 100 Shortage 2 4 6 8 0 Q Quantity Market Equilibrium Algebraic solution: equate the demand and supply equations (Qd=Qs). Qd = 8 - 0.02P Qs = 0 + 0.02 P Step by step solution: 8 - 0.02P = 0 + 0.02 P 0.04P = 8 P* = 8/0.04 = 200 Qd = 8 0.02(200) = 8 4 = 4 P* =200 per unit, Q* = 4 per month End Part 1 ...
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This note was uploaded on 07/04/2011 for the course ECON 100.2 taught by Professor Blossom during the Spring '11 term at University of the Philippines Diliman.

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