lecture 7

lecture 7 - 1 Lecture 7 Mass vs. weight Examples of forces...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Lecture 7 Mass vs. weight Examples of forces Gravity (long-range force) Normal force (contact force) Tension (contact force) Friction (contact force) Drawing free body diagrams 2 Mass vs. weight Mass is an inherent property of a body, independent of the bodys surroundings and of the method used to measure it. Weight is the force of gravity acting on the body. Dependent upon the bodys location. 3 Gravity is the force between two masses. No contact is needed between the bodies. The force of gravity is always attractive! Example of a long-range force 4 y g w eo mg m- = = N/kg 8 . 9 = = g g Near the surface of the Earth: where (weight force of the Earth on object) To measure a bodys true weight the body must not be accelerating, otherwise you will only measure its apparent weight. 5 Note that m eo w g = This is the gravitational force per unit mass and is called the gravitational field strength. In the case of an object in free fall near the surface of the Earth it would be correctly called the acceleration due to gravity. 6 Example: Drop a ball of mass1 kg near the surface of the...
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This note was uploaded on 07/04/2011 for the course PHYS 121 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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lecture 7 - 1 Lecture 7 Mass vs. weight Examples of forces...

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