Lecture 14

Lecture 14 - ECE52 Spring 11 Lecture 14 2/14/11 Watson vs...

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1 ECE52 Spring 11 Lecture 14 2/14/11 Watson vs Humans? Digilunch Wednesday noon LSRC
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2 Base 2 B = b n-1 b n-2 …b 1 b 0 So n-bit number can represent numbers from 0 to 2 n - 1 Left-most bit associated with highest power of 2: Most Significant Bit - MSB Right-most bit associated with 2 0 (i.e. 1’s place): Least Significant Bit - LSB - = - - - - × = × + × + + × + × = 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 ... 2 2 ) ( n i i i n n n n b b b b b B V
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3 Examples – 8 bits • What is 10010010 2 in decimal? What is largest 8-bit binary number? What is smallest 8-bit binary number? • How do you represent 85 10 as an 8-bit binary number? • How do you represent 565 10 as an 8-bit binary number?
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4 Examples – 8 bits • What is 10010010 2 in decimal? 146 What is largest 8-bit binary number? 255 What is smallest 8-bit binary number? 0 • How do you represent 85 10 as an 8-bit
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5 Base Conversion Converting binary to decimal is straightforward – just apply and note you could work left-to-right or right-to-left! Decimal to binary is a little more tricky – one way is to work left-to-right, determining lead power of 2 first for 85, by inspection it lies between 64 and 128 so we start with 2 6 , then 85-64=21 left. 21: smaller than 32 so 0 for 2 5 , greater than 16 so 1 for 2 4 , etc. etc. Tricky part is the “by inspection”! - = × = 1 0 2 ) ( n i i i b B V
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6 Another conversion method: successive divide-by-2 (in book) • Given k-digit decimal number D=d k-1 …d 0 it will eventually have n-digit binary representation B=b n-1 …b 0 – we don’t know it yet (or even n yet!) but it exists As always, If we divide V/2: 0 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 ... 2 2 ) ( ) ( b b b b V B V D V n n n n + × + + × + × = = = - - - - 2 2 ... 2 2 2 0 0 1 3 2 2 1 b b b b V n n n n + × + + × + × = - - - -
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7 We’re really just determining if V was even or odd! Expressed as integer division, remainder of V/2 was just b 0 , So if V/2 has no remainder (i.e. the number was even) b 0 must have been 0!
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This note was uploaded on 07/05/2011 for the course ECE 52 taught by Professor Dr.jonathanboard during the Spring '11 term at Duke.

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Lecture 14 - ECE52 Spring 11 Lecture 14 2/14/11 Watson vs...

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