The frame for a professional tennis racket

The frame for a professional tennis racket - IE 370 Final...

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IE 370 Final Project Manufacturing Processes I Faridd El'Azar Hasbani IE 370 Prof Gary Cheng May 2 2011 1
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The frame for a professional racquet During the course of Materials and Processes (IE 370), we got to learn and achieved the fundamentals of forming and machining processes and tooling. I got to learn how in the real work things are produced different, methods, tolerance to determine acceptance of a certain project in the area. We are thought to recognize the real potential of major manufacturing processes around different areas in the field. As an Industrial Engineer, I was determined to choose and analyze how the frame for a professional tennis racket was made and how the machining process and tooling were used during the formation of this really interesting material. I (in my opinion) believe that this area is extremely wide and has so much potential to be improve and innovate, and me as the Engineer could help in that circumstance, first analyze it, and then see how I can help improve the area to be cheaper and more effective. The project, as I said before, was to design the manufacturing process of a tennis racquet. Throughout the recent progress and innovation of the sporting industry, corporations have dedicated a considerable amount of time and money into the improvement of use of material and weight of the racket. This development, obviously should avoid the significance increase of production cost, but most importantly reduce weight of the tennis racquet consequently improving the performances of the players. Introduction Tennis, Racquetball, Pin Pong, and many other sports used rackets have a funny and really interesting story behind it. By most accounts, French 3
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monks first played tennis in the 12 th century, and the first “racquets” were made of human flesh! No, it wasn’t some medieval horror; it was actually a passion in those days. By the 14 th century, players had begun using what we could call legitimately a racquet, with strings made of gut bound in a wooden frame. The Italians are often credited with this invention. 15 th century, racquets had a long handle and a small, teardrop-shaped head (as you can see in the picture above). With a more oval head, they would have looked much like a squash racquet. The game itself was somewhat like squash too, in that it was played indoors with a fairly dead ball. By this time, it wasn’t played against a wall thou, but across a net. During the 1800s the changes were huge, not only because they don’t use human flesh, but also wooden racquets were improved. With improvements in laminating technology (using thin layers of wood glued together) and in strings, but they remained heavy, with small heads, compared to the contemporary racquet, even the best wood racquets were cumbersome and lacking in power. A racquet, according to many historians and engineers, with metal head existed as
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This note was uploaded on 07/06/2011 for the course PHIL 330 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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The frame for a professional tennis racket - IE 370 Final...

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