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statistics for dropout into college

statistics for dropout into college - Search How do I...

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Search How do I... Create an account Receive the Weekly Digest email Submit an Event Post Comments Add a tag Send feedback Founding Contributors Alberto Alesina Richard Baldwin Erik Berglöf Giuseppe Bertola Olivier Blanchard Tito Boeri Willem Buiter Michael Burda Stephen Cecchetti Daniel Cohen Juan Dolado Esther Duflo Barry Eichengreen Jeffrey Frankel Francesco Giavazzi Rachel Griffith Philip Lane Philippe Martin Richard Portes Carmen M. Reinhart Anne Sibert Guido Tabellini Shang-Jin Wei
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Charles Wyplosz My account Create account Reset password Login Navigation Debates My Unread Create content Recent posts The declining American high school  graduation rate: Evidence, sources,  and consequences James J. Heckman     Paul A. LaFontaine P 13 February 2008 Print     Email Comment     Republish Official statistics for US high school graduation rates mask a growing  educational divide. This column presents research showing that a record  number of Americans are going to university – while an increasing number are  dropping out of high school. This poses major social challenges for the United  States. The high school graduation rate is a barometer of the health of American  society and the skill level of its future workforce. Throughout the first half of the  20th century, each new cohort of Americans was more likely to graduate high  school than the preceding one. This upward trend in secondary education  increased worker productivity and fueled American economic growth (Goldin  and Katz 2003). During the past 25 years, growing wage differentials between high school  graduates and dropouts increased the economic incentives to graduate high 
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James J. Heckman     Paul A. LaFontaine P 13 February 2008 Print     Email Comment     Republish school. The real wages of high school dropouts have declined since the early  1970s   while  those   of  more   skilled   workers   have   risen   sharply. 1   Heckman,  Lochner, and Todd (2008) show that in recent decades, the internal rate of  return to graduating high school  compared to dropping out has increased  dramatically   and   is   now   over   50   percent.   Therefore,   it   is   surprising   and  disturbing that, at a time when the premium for skills has increased and the  return to graduating high school has risen, the high school dropout rate in  America   is   increasing.   America   is   becoming   a   polarised   society.  Proportionately more American youth are going to college and graduating than  ever before. At the same time, proportionately more are failing to complete high  school.
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