Lec15 Molecular Orbital - BONDING THEORIES(Part 3 1...

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LMALaput Chemistry 16 Lecture 15 BONDING THEORIES (Part 3) 1. Compounds with Multiple Bonds 2. Molecular Orbital Theory COMPOUNDS WITH DOUBLE BONDS •Ethene or ethylene, C 2 H 4 , is the simplest organic compound containing a double bond. Lewis dot formula N = 2(8) + 4(2) = 24 A = 2(4) + 4(1) = 12 S= 12 e- shared •Compound must have a double bond to obey octet rule. Valence Bond Theory (Hybridization) C atom has four electrons. Three electrons from each C atom are in sp 2 hybrids. One electron in each C atom remains in an unhybridized p orbital •An sp 2 hybridized C atom has this shape. Remember there will be one electron in each of the three sp 2 lobes and one in the p orbital. The portion of the double bond formed from the head-on overlap of the sp 2 hybrids is designated as a s bond. •The other portion of the double bond, resulting from the side-on overlap of the p orbitals, is designated as a p bond. •Thus a C=C bond looks like this and is made of two parts, one s and one p bond. COMPOUNDS WITH TRIPLE BONDS •Ethyne or acetylene, C 2 H 2 , is the simplest triple bond containing organic compound. Lewis Dot Formula N = 2(8) + 2(2) = 20 A = 2(4) + 2(1) =10 S = 10 e- shared •Compound must have a triple bond to obey octet rule. Valence Bond Theory (Hybridization) Carbon has 4 electrons.
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This note was uploaded on 07/09/2011 for the course SCIENCE 16 taught by Professor Uperg during the Spring '11 term at University of the Philippines Diliman.

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Lec15 Molecular Orbital - BONDING THEORIES(Part 3 1...

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