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Educational Implications of Socioeconomic Status

Educational Implications of Socioeconomic Status - Axia...

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Axia College Material Appendix D Educational Implications of Socioeconomic Status Matrix Directions: Based on your personal experiences and on the readings for this course, answer the questions in the green section of the matrix as they apply to each of the listed socioeconomic classes. Fill in your answers and post your final draft as an attachment to your Individual forum. AED 204
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AED 204 Socioeconomic Classes Questions Unemployed and Homeless Working Class Middle Class Upper Middle Class Upper Class Who is most likely to be a part of this socioeconomic class? People who have lost their jobs of have had serious long-term illness. They lack education and wealth to provide a reasonable living situation. Families who have education in trade business like electricians, plumbers, auto- mechanics and so on. They are people who work in “blue collar” jobs. They usually have secondary education but none beyond that. These people are considered to be in the lower level of the “white collar” jobs. They have some college education if not a professional degree, a reasonable income with some money set aside in savings. Teachers, policemen, CNAs, and public sector employees fall into this category. These people share many attributes with the middle class. They have college educations with professional degrees and certifications; mostly they are in the management or the top of their fields. They tend to have more disposable income and are able to spend money on vacations. These people tend to be executives or owners of businesses. They have a substantial amount of disposable income and large sums of money invested in things like IRAs, mutual funds, stocks and bonds. The upper class also tends to have prestigious college educations and political connections.
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