notes-MT-review.pdf - AERO 417 \u2013 STANDARDS\/RULES\/CERTIFICATION OF AEROSPACE MIDTERM REVIEW PACKAGE(Lectures 1-5 Lecture 1 \u2013 Introduction There are

notes-MT-review.pdf - AERO 417 u2013...

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AERO 417 – STANDARDS/RULES/CERTIFICATION OF AEROSPACE MIDTERM REVIEW PACKAGE (Lectures 1-5)
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Lecture 1 – Introduction There are two types of aircrafts: Lighter than air (ie. Hot air balloon, blimp) Heavier than air (ie. Commercial aircraft) There are 3 major categories for modes of failure in aerospace: Man – All the people involved in aviation Environmental – External Factors Machine – Issues with said aircraft The difference between an “Accident” and an “Incident” lies in the result. The definition of both respectively are defined as follows: Accident: An occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft, in the case of manned aircraft, that takes place between the time any person boards the air craft with the intention of flight until such time as all such persons have disembarked, or in the case of unmanned aircraft, takes place between the time the aircraft is ready to move with the purpose of flight until such time as it comes to rest at the end of the flight and the primary propulsion system is show down, in which: a) A person is seriously or fatally injured as a result of: Being in the aircraft Direct contact with any part of the air craft, including parts that have become detached from the aircraft or direct exposure to jet blast Except when the injuries are from natural causes, self-inflicted or inflicted by other persons, or when the injuries are to stowaways hiding outside the areas normally available to the passengers and crew b) Aircraft experiences damage or structural failure: Adversely affects the structural strength, performance or flight characteristics of the aircraft Require major repair or replacement of the affected component Failure or damage, when the damage is limited to the engine, its cowling ir accessories or for damage limited to propellers, wing tips, antennas, tires, brakes, fairings, small dents, or puncture holes in the aircraft
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c) Air craft is missing or is inaccessible Incident: Circumstances indicating high probability of an accident and associated with aircraft operation under the same manned and unmanned conditions as an “Accident” The “ Dirty Dozen” (Gordon Dupont, 1993) are the 12 categories of man-made sources of error that can result in accident or incident. It is important to note that they are not independent from each other; they can be linked and/or consequential. Source Description Lack of Communication - Top of contributing factors in accident reports (only 30% received and understood) - Messages between transmitter and receiver are unclear or inaccessible - Assumptions are often made Complacency - Self-satisfaction accompanied by loss of awareness - Arise from conducting routine activities - Only seeing what they expect to see - Basically getting cocky and fucking up Lack of Knowledge - Lack of knowledge/experienced lead to misjudged situations - Systems and procedures can change substantially making current knowledge out of date Distraction - Anything that draws attention away from a task - Unavoidable (noises or immediate
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