HIST2057_Exam1_KeyTerms

HIST2057_Exam1_KeyTerms - Lecture # 1 The United States to...

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Lecture # 1 – The United States to 1865 1. Missouri Compromise (1820) - an agreement passed in 1820 between the pro- slavery and anti-slavery factions in the United States Congress , involving primarily the regulation of slavery in the western territories . a. Missouri would obtain statehood 2. Wilmot Proviso (1846) - The Wilmot Proviso, one of the major events leading to the Civil War , would have banned slavery in any territory to be acquired from Mexico in the Mexican War or in the future, including the area later known as the Mexican Cession , but which some proponents construed to also include the disputed lands in south Texas and New Mexico east of the Rio Grande. [1] a. Congressman David Wilmot first introduced the Proviso in the United States House of Representatives on August 8, 1846 3. Compromise of 1850 - The Compromise of 1850 was an intricate package of five bills, passed in September 1850, which defused a four-year confrontation between the slave states of the South and the free states of the North regarding the status of territories acquired during the Mexican-American War (1846–1848). a. No Mexican slaves would be obtained after the war. b. California becomes a free state 4. Abolitionists – believe in an immediate and uncompensated end of slavery (fraction of North). 5.
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This note was uploaded on 07/10/2011 for the course HIS 2057 taught by Professor Hilton during the Summer '10 term at LSU.

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HIST2057_Exam1_KeyTerms - Lecture # 1 The United States to...

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