CS 365 - Course Project - Randall Hall - backup

CS 365 - Course Project - Randall Hall - backup - Hall 1...

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Hall 1 Randall Hall Michael A. Bond CS 365 Networks / Data Communication March 3, 2004 A Detailed Look at Wireless Computing Imagine being an insurance claims adjustor who could take pictures, file a report and submit a claim all at the scene of a client’s traffic accident. Imagine being a doctor or nurse with the ability to view a patients chart, order medications, view lab results, and submit a discharge request right at the patient’s bedside. What if you were a sports fanatic stuck on a long subway commute during your favorite team’s championship playoff game and could see real-time scores, statistics, play- by-play coverage and even live video footage during the long ride home. Does it all sound like something from a Sci-fi movie? Well, believe it or not, this is not the future; it’s right now, and right here. Wireless computing is a reality. Unless you have been living under a rock for the last several years you’ve heard of wireless computing, and most likely used it whether you realize it or not. Wireless technology has been around for years in taxi cab systems, delivery and service trucks, and even in several electronic components right in your very own home. But that type of wireless technology is little more than inventory tracking, vehicle location, and opening garage doors and changing TV
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Hall 2 channels. It is not nearly as exciting as the earlier mentioned useful and entertaining capabilities of wireless technology, is it? The main differences between the wireless technology of yesterday and the cutting-edge technology of today are speed, range, bandwidth, and availability. Wireless technology today is more than just a wireless connection; it’s high-speed, high- bandwidth wireless computing. Entire networks and new devices have been put in place to more fully take advantage of the incredible technology that is wireless computing. In order to gain a better understanding of what wireless computing really is you need to familiarize yourself with existing infrastructure, devices, capabilities and limitations. Wireless networks are the backbone of wireless computing. Wireless devices connect to these networks using recently- developed and enhanced wireless protocols. Wireless security features help safeguard information as it travels through the air between client devices and network hardware. Wireless devices, security components and the network infrastructure itself together make up today’s wireless computing. Wireless networks are very similar to traditional wired networks; in fact wired networks play a big part in wireless computing. They form a major piece of what are called wireless Local Area Networks, or wLANs. A wLAN is “a type of local-area network that uses high-frequency radio waves rather than wires to communicate between nodes.” (Webopedia. Online word definition: wLAN) wLANs transmit and receive information through the air using radio frequency (RF). The existing wired network
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Hall 3
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This note was uploaded on 07/10/2011 for the course CS 365 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '09 term at Park.

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CS 365 - Course Project - Randall Hall - backup - Hall 1...

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