CookLevinandMore - NP-CompletenessNP-CompletenessLimits of ComputationClayton JohnsonEdna ReiterLimits of Computation by Johnson& Reiter2Two

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Unformatted text preview: NP-CompletenessNP-CompletenessLimits of ComputationClayton JohnsonEdna ReiterLimits of Computation by Johnson & Reiter2Two definitions for NPDefinition 6.1: A decision problem P is in NPif there is a Nondeterministic Turing Machine that runs in time bounded by a polynomial.Definition 6.2: A decision problem is in NPif and only if it has a polynomial verifier Verifier = Turing machine that checks ifa proposed solution C is truly a solutionLimits of Computation by Johnson & Reiter3Examples of verifiersGiven a graph G, the sequence of nodes 1,4,2,9,8 (the certificate) is a path from node 1 to node 8The boolean expression (x ∨z) ⋀(¬y ∨z) ⋀(x ∨¬y) ⋀( ¬y) is true for (x,y,z) = (1,0,1) = certificateGiven an array A, the number M is the maximum value in the array. (M is the certificate)Given integer N and integers n1, …nm, there are k of them that sum to NLimits of Computation by Johnson & Reiter4Examples of verifiersPath 1,4,2,9,8: Check that there are edges 1-4, 4-2, 2-9, and 9-8Boolean: (x V z) ⋀(¬y V z) ⋀(x V ¬y) ⋀( ¬y) = (1∨1) ⋀(1∨1) (⋀10) (∨ ⋀1) which is trueA has max M: check ai<= M for all i in the arrayVerify each is polynomial!!!Limits of Computation by Johnson & Reiter5Nondeterministic Poly-TimeTheorem :A language L is in NP if and only ifL can be decided by a poly-time nondeterministic TM;That is, definitions 6.1 and 6.2 are equivalent.Proof: Let A∈NPhave an O(nk) time verifier V. A polytime NTM can guess the O(nk) certificate c for x∈A and check that it is a certificate.Let N be the O(nk) time nondeterministic decider for B. The path to the accept state is a certificate, and is polynomial. The verifier only needs to show that this path does lead to the accept state.Limits of Computation by Johnson & Reiter6Nondeterministic Poly-TimeCorollary: Let NTIME(t(n)) be the class of languages decidable by a O(t(n)) nondeterministic Turing machine. Theni,...2,1kk)n(NTIME==NPAside: Most of the time, the certificate/verifierway of looking at NP problems gives morerelevant information.Note that only proofs for x∈A are required,not for the complement x∉A.Limits of Computation by Johnson & Reiter7Boolean Formulas and SATA Boolean variablex can be TRUE or FALSE,which is also denoted by “1” or “0”.Standard Boolean operationsare AND (x∧y),OR (x∨y), and NOT (¬x or also x ).Typical Boolean formula: φ(x,y) = (¬x∨y) ∧(x∨¬y).This φis satisfiable (by the assignmentsx=y=TRUE and x=y=FALSE).SAT = {<φ> | φis a satisfiable Boolean formula}Limits of Computation by Johnson & Reiter8Conjunctive Normal FormLiteral= Boolean variable (x) or its negation (¬x).Clause= A set of OR-ed literals, like (x ∨¬y ∨z)A formula φis in conjunctive normal form(CNF),if it is the AND of clauses. For example:A 3CNFformula has only clauses with 3 literals:)yyz()z()yx()z,y,x(∨∨∧∧∨=φ)yyz()zzz()zyx()z,y,x(∨∨∧∨∨∧∨∨=φ3SAT = {<φ> | φis a satisfiable 3CNF formula}Limits of Computation by Johnson & Reiter...
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This note was uploaded on 07/11/2011 for the course CSUEB cs 6260 taught by Professor Eddie during the Spring '11 term at CSU East Bay.

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CookLevinandMore - NP-CompletenessNP-CompletenessLimits of ComputationClayton JohnsonEdna ReiterLimits of Computation by Johnson& Reiter2Two

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