{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chinese 101 Syllabus

Chinese 101 Syllabus - 1 0 1 Location and Time Section 001...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 1 0 1 Location and Time Section 001 Daily 8:00-9:50 am Beginning Chinese Summer 2011 1107 JKB Instructors Julie Lefgren ( - zhu losh) e-mail: [email protected] Office hours: TTH 10:00-11:00 am OFFICE: 4060 JKB Tony Zhang (MWF) Email: [email protected] Offices: 3006 JKB Office hours: TBA Chinese section of the Department of Asian & Near Eastern Languages Homepage: (course offerings, major/minor requirements, etc.) - http://asiane.byu.edu/chinese/ Required Materials 1. Chinese Link Textbook. Traditional Character Version, 2nd Edition This is the main text which contains the dialogues, vocabulary, grammar notes, and drills. Audio tracks are available in the HLRC lab, the HLRC website: hlrc.byu.edu, or the Chinese Link website: http://wps.prenhall.com/wl_wu_chineselink_1 2. Chinese Link Workbook, Traditional Character Version, 2nd Edition This workbook accompanies the above text. Though there are some oral/aural exercises, the bulk of the exercises in this text are for reading, writing, and grammar. Audio is available in the HLRC lab or the HLRC website for use with this text (websites above). Extra Materials 1. Chinese Link Audio Program Hrlc.byu.edu/online media audio track for the textbook and workbook if you would like your own copy. Ipod downloads available in the HLRC lab 2. Chinese style grid paper (online grid paper provided by teacher posted on Blackboard) Lab Hours and Location HRLC 1141 JFSB Computer Lab 3065 JKHB hlrc.byu.edu M-Th: 7:45 am to 9 pm M-Th: 9 am to 9 pm Friday: 7:45 am to 6 pm Friday: 9 am to 6 pm Saturday: 10 am to 6 pm Saturday: 10 am to 9 pm Course Objectives The goal of this course is to continue to teach you how to function successfully in Chinese language and culture. Learning to speak a foreign language entails learning how to behave appropriately in that foreign culture. Communication then involves more than just knowing the right words. It also means knowing how to act, what to say, how to say it, with whom it is appropriate to use certain language, gesture, body language, and so on. In this course we will strive to go beyond grammar and vocabulary (the linguistic code) and learn how to successfully represent yourself, develop and maintain relationships, and generally how to behave in a culturally appropriate way in a Chinese context. This means that we expect you to learn how to conduct yourself in such a way that a native Chinese person would find comfortable. If a Chinese person has to adapt to you in order to communicate, it is not likely that you can accomplish what you intend in China. To truly learn and speak Chinese fluently is a lifetime endeavor. In order to do these things more successfully, you will have to perform. Performance, your performance is essential to this course. In fact, a large part of your grade will be based on your daily participation/preparation and performance of Chinese, performing dialogues, reading, writing, taking quizzes and test taking. In this course we will continue building the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. With regards to speaking and listening, we will work on initiating, sustaining, and closing conversations based on general topics. We will work on moving away from sentence level grammar and conversational exchanges to more extended paragraph length discourse. We will explore such genres as narration, descriptions, etc. Instructional goals In this course we will focus specifically on learning the following communication skills. Listening & Speaking In the area of listening you will learn to understand simple questions and answers, statements, and face- to-face conversations. You will also begin to develop the ability to understand main ideas, and you will be exposed to authentic spoken Chinese via textbook audio segments. In the area of speaking, you will not only learn to use familiar memorized language, but also create language by making up your own sentences, participate in face-to-face conversations, and by asking and answering basic questions. Reading & Writing You will learn to read basic Chinese based on what you have learned to say. This will be mostly at the sentence level. You will learn to write (in Chinese characters) most of what you will learn to say. Properly written characters are essential to learning Chinese. If your characters are sloppy, missing lines, written outside the box and/or written in the wrong stroke order this will result in points being taken off. At all levels of Chinese you are expected to have exactness in writing characters. Please make note that this is important to the correct learning of Chinese. You will be expected to know every word introduced in each lesson. You are expected to know how to write each one of these characters. This will be practiced in class, but the learning of Chinese characters requires a lot of out-of-class practice. You need to be able to read all the lesson's characters and are expected to know how to use, write and read all vocabulary words in the "Core Vocabulary" section. The "Supplementary Vocabulary" section are useful, will most likely appear in the lessons and be used in class, however these will not appear on tests or quizzes. Classes There will be two kinds of classes in this course: ACT and FACT. An ACT class is the MWF section of the course. This part of the course is designed to elicit your performance. These classes are conducted entirely in Chinese. English will not be used or allowed in these classes, except when asked for with a Chinese request. Daily evaluation points can be taken off for a lack of effort to use Chinese in the ACT Classes. In an ACT class we are striving to simulate, as much as possible, an authentic Chinese speaking environment. We consider English to be incompatible with the goal of maintaining that kind of environment. If taken seriously, this will be an important bridge to a truly authentic native speaking environment. Since English will not be allowed in ACT classes, we will expect you to be familiar with the classroom expressions necessary for communication in a Chinese-only speaking environment. If you need to learn more phrases, be sure to request how to say these words/phrases. FACT classes are designed to impart the information and knowledge necessary to successfully perform in the ACT classes. A mixture of English and Chinese will be used most of the time in a FACT class. FACT classes are the time to ask questions, discuss grammar and vocabulary, discuss the social and cultural implications of the language, and discuss other cultural issues that arise. We may also do some listening comprehension exercises or other language guiding activities on FACT days as well. Generally, FACT days will be 2 days a week (T/TH) and ACT classes will be 3 days a week (MWF). With the syllabus, schedule and other information received, it should always be very clear about what and how to prepare for each class. We will follow a predictable schedule as follows: Basic Schedule We will cover two lessons a week starting with Intro and Lesson 1 (refer to attached schedule). The basic schedule will be based on a five period rotation usually beginning on Monday and ending on Friday. Refer to the Core vocabulary list that you will be required to know for quizzes and in class character writing reviews. Dialogues, basic grammar and vocab of the lessons will be required for in-class performances. Keep in mind that even though some of the material will not be required on quizzes, we may still use that material in classroom activities, thus a passive knowledge of the material is necessary. M Dialogue - pronunciation work; oral activities [perform memorize dialogue, practice pronunciation, be familiar with vocabulary and patterns, begin reviewing characters] T FACT: new grammar and vocabulary; discussion on culture; language building activities; listening comprehension activities. 10 free write sentences due: 10 sentences per lesson. (with the exception of the first week when only 10 s entences from lesson 1 is due on Thurs.) W R F [read all the grammar and vocabulary notes, come prepared with questions about cultural use of the language, practice reading and writing characters] Expansion on dialogue; pattern practice; communicative oral activities [be very familiar with the "Language in Use" dialogue of the lesson, including assigned vocab and patterns, continue practicing reading and writing characters] Reading & writing exercises; Lesson; Quiz [review assigned r/w exercises provided in class, be prepared to read and write assigned words, Quiz] Communicative oral activities; personalized dialogues with partner (beginning Week 2); Homework due @ beginning of class [continue practicing using language in the lesson by working with the audio, prepare dialogue with partner(s) and be prepared to perform at the beginning of class, review assigned characters] Evaluation--Daily grading In-class performance, citizenship and participation points comprise approximately 20% of your grade. The breakdown for this part of your grade is outlined below. In the case you miss class it is your responsibility to obtain any information that was given during class. Laptops are not needed in class and use of them during class will result in reduced participation points and consistent use of them will result in reduced participation points. Of course, assigned homework, quizzes, tests and other assignments are important and are the other portion of your grade. There are multiple facets to the grading system for this course; your average will not be affected much by any single score. Consistency is the key. In-class participation and performance standard Participation points: In-class performance, citizenship and participation comprise approximately 20% of your grade. In the MWF section classes you may receive up to 8 points (8 being a perfect score) per day based on your punctuality, preparedness, respect of teacher and others, participation and attendance. This daily scoring is decided by the instructor and is not negotiable. The scores for this portion of participation are posted on the gradebook and are cumulative for the relevant week. At the end of the semester the TAs and the instructor will assess your overall participation for the entire term. There are 100 points total available for this overall participation and will be given at the end of the semester. How to prepare for class Coming prepared, having read the lesson and being familiar with the grammar and new vocab is essential to success in Chinese 101. The audio material that accompanies the book is extremely important element to your preparation for daily classes, and it is a requirement of the course that you listen to these on a regular (eg: daily) basis. Quizzes may have a listening section with questions. These will come directly from the "Language in Use" text. You will score higher if you have listened to the dialogue and understand it fluently. It is recommended that you use the HRLC website (hlrc.byu.edu) to listen to the files and/or go to the HLRC to have them download to an IPod/MP3 player this is free. Please contact the HRLC for details. It is vital to your success that you use the audio materials together with the textbook. The audio tracks are perhaps one of the single most important elements to your experience in Chinese 102, and it is a requirement of the course that you listen to the audio tracks on a regular (i.e. daily) basis. It is vital to your success that you use the audio tracks together with the textbook. In fact, you may spend as much or more time listening to the audio tracks than with the textbook. When memorizing a dialogue it is suggested that you use the text only briefly to familiarize yourself with the context of the dialogue and the newly introduced language. Beyond that, you should use only the taped version of the dialogue until you have mastered it and can imagine yourself comfortably assuming the roles of the speakers. When practicing with the audio tracks, repeat your responses out loud so you can hear yourself speaking. You may even want to record your voice and compare it with the native models on the audio tracks. As you memorize the dialogues and prepare to perform in class, remember that we are striving for realistic performances, just as you might perform on a stage, and not merely a memorized recitation. Remember that body language and other non-linguistic elements are very important. Just saying the right lines is not enough; it must be practiced and performed as if you were in that real situation. This type of exercise will prepare you for real-life application of Chinese. Dialogue/Performance grading scale: All memorized dialogue and performances are graded on a scale of 0-8 points. (see schedule for dialogue and performances) Below is the description of the grading scale: 8.0 - 7 Solid preparation is evident and performance is fully culturally coherent, that is, speaking and responding to speech in ways in which natives of Chinese culture expect people to speak, and respond. Tones are correct and pronunciation is as close to native as possible. Comprehension would present no difficulty, discomfort, or misunderstanding for a native. Repair (restating, or correcting yourself) is self- managed. 6.0 - 5 Good preparation with decent performance, such that there would be little to create difficulties, discomfort, or misunderstanding in interaction with a native. However, some noticeable errors in memorization, tones and pronunciation could hinder smooth interaction. Most repairs are self managed. 4.0 - 3 Some preparation is evident but memorization or practice is largely missing. Overall performance also presents several clear sources of difficulty, discomfort, or misunderstanding in communicating with a native. Difficulty with correct tones and pronunciation and comprehension of other speaker is apparent. Repair is largely a matter of correcting problems, and comes mostly from others. 2.0 - 0 Barely any preparation with performance that would create considerable difficulties, discomfort, and/or misunderstanding in communicating with a native. Clearly not in control of the assigned material. Little to no correct tones and/or pronunciation. Overall dialogue is not understood nor comprehended in exchange. Homework and papers You should plan on using the workbook on a regular basis and throughout the week. Doing so will help you better prepare for class. The TA and the instructor are available during office hours or by appointment if you need assistance with your homework. Please plan on working on your reading and writing every day. If you wait until Thursday night to do your reading and writing homework, you will perform poorly in class and on quizzes. Reading, and especially writing, must be practiced on a regular (i.e. daily) basis. It is suggested that you use a grid style paper to practice writing characters as this will help you develop the skill of keeping each character consistently written. 10 sentences (10 per lesson) of your own creation are due at the beginning of class every Tues per the lesson we are working on that week (see schedule). Once these are returned corrected, if you so choose, you may re-write the assignment for re-grading and receive the highest grade for that assignment. Corrected sentence will only be accepted the following Tues when you hand in the new sentences. These sentences MUST be written on provided grid. A .pdf of this grid paper is posted on the Blackboard, under "Writing Resources." Any other type of paper will not be accepted and considered as zero. Homework MUST be turned in on time at the beginning of the Friday class. Any late homework, for ANY reason will be docked 50% off the total possible for the first day and not accepted the next day. Late means that is turned in after the beginning of class. If you have a situation that prevents you from turning in the homework on time arrangements must be made to turn it in before the time it is due, otherwise it will be counted late regardless of the situation. Any written English assignment (research paper, etc) must be turned in in hard copy format at the beginning of class the day it is due. Anything late will automatically be docked as specified above. The cultural activity and extra assignments are to be written in English and typed with a 1.5 spacing. Research Paper You will be required to research a topic of your choosing about China and write a 3-page paper for cultural learning. True research involves referring to scholars and experts on that topic. Wikipedia is not considered a scholarly source; points will be taken off for inadequate resources. Refer to schedule as to when this report is due. Makeup work No makeup quizzes, tests, dialogues or performances of any kind will be allowed. If you are unable to take a quiz, test or perform in class as assigned for any reason (bar extreme sickness and/or an unforeseen emergency situation with appropriate documentation only excuses with proper documentation will be accepted [eg: doctors note]) you will forfeit the points for the activity. Per University policy the final will not be given early for any reason. Refer to the attached term schedule for the scheduled requirements. Grading All grades will be based on the point scale outlined below. All grades will be posted on the blackboard gradebook. Any questions about grading needs to be addressed in a timely manner, not at the end of the term. Any grading concerns brought to the attention of the instructor after the last day of class will not be addressed. Typical grading will be as below: Dialogue/performance 8 points (per lesson) MWF daily participation 8 pts (per day) Overall performance grade 100 pts 10 Sentence weekly assignment 10 points (per lesson) Homework 50 points (25 per lesson) Quizzes 16 points Research Paper 50 points Tests (Midterm & Final) 100 points Your final grade will be based on the total of your grades throughout the term, and then converted to a percentage scale as follows: Grade % Scale: A 94 ~ 100% A 90 ~ 93 % B+ 87~89% B 84~86% B- 80 ~ 83% C+ 77~79% C 74~76% C- 70~73% D+ 67~69% D 64~66% D- 60~63% E 59% & below Outside class learning activities Other Chinese Practice Opportunities You are encouraged to use your Chinese as frequently as possible with native speakers of the language. BYU has a study buddy program which aligns native speakers with students of the language. More information will be announced about this in class, however proactively seeking this opportunity early in the semester is to you benefit. Other suggestions include: visiting a Chinese restaurant or grocery store (Chao's on University and 100 North) speaking with and befriending native Chinese students watching Chinese cable television (campus cable channel 24) visiting the Chinese language houses and eating dinner with them (across from the MTC) attending the Provo Chinese branch for church (times posted on Blackboard) volunteering as an investigator at the MTC, etc The more you strive to use your Chinese outside of class, the more comfortable and successful you will be as a learner. Learning Chinese is a life long endeavor. Midterm Exam Oral: In class refer to schedule Written: refer to schedule - in testing center (all day) Final Exam Oral: In class refer to schedule Written: refer to schedule - in testing center Honor Code The instructors fully support the BYU Honor Code and expect all students to be familiar with it and support it in every way. Preventing Sexual Harassment Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex discrimination against any participant in an educational program or activity that receives federal funds. The act is intended to eliminate sex discrimination in education. Title IX covers discrimination in programs, admissions, activities, and student-...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern