ComputerForensicsOverview

ComputerForensicsOverview - Overview of Computer(Digital...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Overview of Computer (Digital) Forensics CIS 3003, Introduction to Information Technology Dr. Sheau-Dong Lang ( [email protected] )
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Computer forensics is largely a response to a demand for service from the law enforcement community [Noblett, Pollitt, and Presley]. The term "Computer Forensics" was coined in 1991 in the first training session held by the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS, http://www.cops.org ) in Portland, Oregon [Marcella and Greenfield]. Computer forensics is “the application of science and engineering to the legal problem of digital evidence” [Sammes and Jenkinson]. What is Computer Forensics? ± Marcella, Albert J., Jr. and Greenfield, Robert S., Cyber Forensics: A Field Manual for Collecting, Examining, and Preserving Evidence of Computer Crimes, Second Edition, Chapter 17, Auerbach Publishers, 2002 ± Noblett, Michael G., Pollitt, Mark M., and Presley, Lawrence A., Recovering and Examining Computer Forensic Evidence, Forensic Science Communications, Volume 2, Number 4, US Department of Justice, October 2000 ± Sammes, T. and Jenkinson, B., Forensic Computing, Springer-Verlag, 2000
Background image of page 2
± as the instrument used in committing a crime (an intruder or a computer virus writer using computers in illegal activities) ± as the victim (a comprised system, data stolen or deleted) ± as a container or storage warehouse for a crime (a cell phone that has pictures of a stolen car, text messages with suspects) Roles of computer (or digital device) played in digital crime investigations: ² The Digital Evidence discipline became part of the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors/Laboratory Accreditation Board’s (ASCLD/LAB) accreditation program in April 2003, see articles by John J. Barbara , Mark Pollitt , and Carrie Whitcomb discussing the efforts led by the SWGDE (Scientific Working Group on Digital Evidence) ² Formation of the new Digital and Multimedia Sciences Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences , 2/20/2008
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
± As personal computers and access to the Internet become more prevalent the modern society is increasingly dependent on the computer and networking technologies for storing, processing, and sharing data, and for email and message communication. ± The proliferation of computers has made computer-based systems and computer networks easy targets for criminal activities. ± Computer crimes were originally thought of just in the terms of hackers and virus makers, mainly due to the fact that at first only a few geeks had access to computers, but now anyone can point and click and use a computer to commit just about any crime ,” Sgt. Stenger , OCSO Computer Crime Squad Computer Crimes and Crime Scene Investigation:
Background image of page 4
± preservation (acquiring evidence without tampering, chain of custody, transport and storage, collecting data within legal constraints) ± identification (labeling each item of evidence, bagging and tagging, identifying with case number, descriptions, date/time
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 30

ComputerForensicsOverview - Overview of Computer(Digital...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online