servlets - part 2 - CNT 4714: Enterprise Computing Spring...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CNT 4714: Servlets – Part 2 Page 1 Dr. Mark Llewellyn © CNT 4714: Enterprise Computing Spring 2011 Introduction to Servlet Technology– Part 2 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cnt4174/spr2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CNT 4714: Servlets – Part 2 Page 2 Dr. Mark Llewellyn © More Tomcat Details If your system does not recognize “localhost”, enter http://127.0.0.1:8080 instead of http://localhost:8080 . Address 127.0.0.1 basically means “this machine” which is the same as localhost. From the Tomcat homepage you can also act as the server administrator and manager. While we won’t need to do anything on the administrator side (you must have set the host manager application during the installation process, (see page 27 of Servlets Part 1)), it is interesting to go into the manager side of things and look at the server from the server’s point of view. It may also be necessary to reload applications occasionally (more on this later), which can be done from the manager application. See page 3 for an example. Checking the status of the server can also be accomplished from the Tomcat homepage. See page 4 for a sample.
Background image of page 2
CNT 4714: Servlets – Part 2 Page 3 Dr. Mark Llewellyn ©
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CNT 4714: Servlets – Part 2 Page 4 Dr. Mark Llewellyn ©
Background image of page 4
CNT 4714: Servlets – Part 2 Page 5 Dr. Mark Llewellyn © A Tour of Tomcat Before we look into creating our own servlets, we need to look more closely at Tomcat. This will help you better understand how web applications are developed and deployed. The directory structure within Tomcat looks like the one shown on the next page. It contains, among other things, seven directories named, bin, conf, logs, lib, webapps, work, and temp . bin Directory bin contains scripts for starting and stopping Tomcat as well as some additional tools. conf Directory conf contains files used to configure Tomcat at the global level, although it is possible for each web application to override many of the values provided in this directory.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CNT 4714: Servlets – Part 2 Page 6 Dr. Mark Llewellyn © Tomcat Directory Structure
Background image of page 6
CNT 4714: Servlets – Part 2 Page 7 Dr. Mark Llewellyn © A Tour of Tomcat (cont.) The most important file inside the conf directory is server.xml , which tells Tomcat the set of services to run when it starts up as well as what port to listen to. This file also specifies the set of resources to make available to applications and a number of security parameters. A portion of this file (the part illustrating the non-SSL HTTP port) is shown on page 8. There is also a web.xml file in this directory, which establishes default values that may be overridden by values in each applications web.xml file. A portion of this file is shown on page 9. The file
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 36

servlets - part 2 - CNT 4714: Enterprise Computing Spring...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online