jsp - part 1 - COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise...

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COP 4610L: JSPs Part 1 Page 1 Mark Llewellyn © COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise Fall 2006 Introduction to JavaServer Pages (JSP) – Part 1 COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise Fall 2006 Introduction to JavaServer Pages (JSP) – Part 1 School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu ENG3 236, 823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cop4610/fall2006
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COP 4610L: JSPs Part 1 Page 2 Mark Llewellyn © Introduction to JavaServer Pages (JSP) JavaServer Pages (JSP) is an extension of servlet technology. JSPs simplify the delivery of dynamic web content. They allow web programmers to create dynamic content by reusing predefined components and by interacting with components using server-side scripting. JSPs can reuse JavaBeans and create custom tag libraries that encapsulate complex, dynamic functionality. JSP classes and interfaces can be found in packages javax.servlet.jsp and javax.servlet.jsp.tagext .
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COP 4610L: JSPs Part 1 Page 3 Mark Llewellyn © Introduction to JSP (cont.) There are four key components to JSPs 1. Directives: messages to the JSP container (server component executing the JSP) that enable the programmer to specify page settings, include content from other resources and specify custom tag libraries to use in a JSP. 2. Actions: encapsulate functionality based on the information sent to the server as part of a specific client request. They can also create Java objects for use in JSP scriplets. 3. Scripting elements: enable the programmer to insert Java code that interacts with components in a JSP to perform request processing. 4. Tag libraries: are part of the tag extension mechanism that enables programmers to create custom tags. Typically, most useful for web page designers with little knowledge of Java.
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COP 4610L: JSPs Part 1 Page 4 Mark Llewellyn © Introduction to JSP (cont.) In some ways, JSPs look like standard XHTML or XML documents. JSPs normally include XHTML or XML markup. Such markup is known as fixed-template data or fixed-template text. Fixed-template data/text often helps a programmer decide whether to use a servlet or a JSP. Recall that JSPs are most often used when most of the content send to the client is fixed-template data and little or none of the content is generated dynamically with Java code. Servlets are more commonly used when only a small amount of the content returned to the client is fixed-template data.
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COP 4610L: JSPs Part 1 Page 5 Mark Llewellyn © Introduction to JSP (cont.) When a JSP-enabled server receives the first request for a JSP, the JSP container translates the JSP into a Java servlet that handles the current request as well as all future requests to the JSP.
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This note was uploaded on 07/14/2011 for the course COP 4610L taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at University of Central Florida.

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jsp - part 1 - COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise...

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