php - part 1

php - part 1 - COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise...

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COP 4610L: PHP – Part 1 Page 1 Mark Llewellyn © COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise Fall 2006 Introduction to PHP – Part 1 COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise Fall 2006 Introduction to PHP – Part 1 School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu ENG3 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cop4610/fall2006
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COP 4610L: PHP – Part 1 Page 2 Mark Llewellyn © Introduction to PHP PHP is officially known as PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor and is very rapidly becoming the most popular server-side scripting language for creating dynamic web pages. PHP was created in 1994 by Rasmus Lerdorf (who currently works for Linuxcare, Inc. as a senior open-source researcher) to track users at his Web site. Lerdorf originally called it Personal Home Page Tools in a package he released in 1995. It eventually became an Apache Software Foundation project. PHP2 featured built-in database support and form handling. In 1997, PHP3 was released and featured a new parser which substantially increased performance and led to an explosion in PHP use.
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COP 4610L: PHP – Part 1 Page 3 Mark Llewellyn © Introduction to PHP (cont.) PHP4 featured the Zend Engine and was considerably faster and more powerful than its predecessors and further enhanced the popularity of PHP. The current release is PHP 5.1.2 and features the Zend Engine 2, which provides further increases in speed and functionality. You can download the latest version of PHP at www.php.net . For more details on the Zend Engine 2 see www.zend.com . Today more than 17 million domains utilize PHP technology. All of the examples we’ll be looking at use the latest stable version of PHP which is 5.1.2 and was released in January 2006.
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COP 4610L: PHP – Part 1 Page 4 Mark Llewellyn © Introduction to PHP (cont.) The power of the Web resides not only in serving content to users, but also in responding to requests from users and generating Web pages with dynamic content. Interactivity between the user and the server has become a crucial part of Web functionality. While other languages can also perform these functions, PHP was written specifically for interacting with the Web. PHP code is embedded directly into XHTML documents. This allows the document author to write XHTML in a clear, concise manner, without having to use multiple print statements, as is necessary with other CGI-based languages.
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COP 4610L: PHP – Part 1 Page 5 Mark Llewellyn © Introduction to PHP (cont.) PHP script file names usually end with .php , although a server can be configured to handle other file extensions. To run a PHP script, PHP must first be installed on your system. Download PHP 5.1.2 from www.php.net . (Most recent version is 5.1.2, but any of the 5.1.x versions should be ok.) Although PHP can be used from the command line, a Web server is required to take full advantage of the scripting language. I would suggest the Apache server available from www.apache.org . (Note: this is not the Tomcat server you’ve already used.)
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php - part 1 - COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise...

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