servlets - part 1 - COP 4610L Applications in the...

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COP 4610L: Servlets – Part 1 Page 1 Mark Llewellyn © COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise Fall 2006 Introduction to Servlet Technology– Part 1 COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise Fall 2006 Introduction to Servlet Technology– Part 1 School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Mark Llewellyn [email protected] ENG3 236, 823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cop4610/fall2006
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COP 4610L: Servlets – Part 1 Page 2 Mark Llewellyn © Client-Server Relationship Revisited In a client-server relationship, the client requests that some action be performed and the server performs the action and responds to the client. •T h i s request-response model of communication is the foundation for the highest-level view of networking in Java – servlets and JavaServer Pages (JSP) . •A servlet extends the functionality of a server, such as a Web server that serves Web pages to a user’s browser using the HTTP protocol. A servlet can almost be thought of as an applet that runs on the server side--without a face. Java servlets make many Web applications possible. Packages javax.servlet and javax.servlet.http provide the classes and interfaces to define servlets. Packages javax.servlet.jsp and javax.servlet.jsp.tagext provide the classes and interfaces that extend the servlet capabilities for JSP.
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COP 4610L: Servlets – Part 1 Page 3 Mark Llewellyn © Client-Server Relationship Revisited (cont.) Using special syntax, JSP allows Web-page implementers to create pages that encapsulate Java functionality and even to write scriplets of actual Java code directly into the page. A common implementation of the request-response model is between Web browsers and Web servers. When a user selects a Web site to browse through the browser (the client application), a request is sent to the appropriate Web server (the server application). The server normally responds to the client by sending the appropriate XHTML Web page. Servlets are effective for developing Web-based solutions that help provide secure access to a Web site, interact with databases on behalf of a client, dynamically generate custom XHTML documents to be displayed by browsers and maintain unique session information for each client.
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COP 4610L: Servlets – Part 1 Page 4 Mark Llewellyn © Static and Dynamic Web Content Consider how a web page is displayed by a browser. Typically, the web page is created using HTML and stored as a file on the web server. A user enters a URL for the file from a web browser. The browser contacts the web server and requests the file. The server finds the file and returns it to the browser. The browser then displays the file for the user. Static information is stored in HTML files. The HTML files can be updated, but at any given time, every request for the same file returns exactly the same content. The contents do not change regardless of who requested the file.
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COP 4610L: Servlets – Part 1 Page 5 Mark Llewellyn © Static and Dynamic Web Content (cont.) Not all information, however, is static in nature.
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This note was uploaded on 07/14/2011 for the course COP 4610L taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at University of Central Florida.

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servlets - part 1 - COP 4610L Applications in the...

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