sql - part 1

sql - part 1 - COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise...

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COP 4610L: SQL Part 1 Page 1 Mark Llewellyn © COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise Fall 2006 Introduction To SQL – Part 1 COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise Fall 2006 Introduction To SQL – Part 1 School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu CSB 242, 823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cop4610/fall2006
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COP 4610L: SQL Part 1 Page 2 Mark Llewellyn © History of SQL SQL, pronounced “S-Q-L” by some and “sequel” by others (mostly old- timers), has become the de facto standard language for creating and querying relational databases. In fact, ANSI has declared that the official pronunciation for SQL is “ es queue el ”. It has been accepted by ANSI (American National Standards Institute) and ISO (International Standards Organization) as well as being a FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard). Between 1974 and 1979, workers at the IBM Research Laboratory in San Jose, California undertook the development of System R. This was shortly after Codd’s classic paper defining the relational database was published. The goal of the System R project was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing the relational model in a DBMS. They used a language named SEQUEL (Structured English QUEry Language), which was a descendent of SQUARE (Specifying QUeries As Relational Expressions), both of which were developed at IBM, San Jose. SEQUEL was renamed to SQL during this project due to a trademark dispute with the Hawker-Siddeley aircraft company in the UK.
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COP 4610L: SQL Part 1 Page 3 Mark Llewellyn © History of SQL (cont.) System R itself was never produced commercially, but directly led to the development of SQL/DS (1981 running under DOS/VE OS, a VM version followed in 1982) which was IBM’s first commercial relational DBMS. IBM however, did not produce the first commercial implementation of a relational DBMS. That honor went to Oracle (Relational Software) in 1979. Today, the relational DBMS system of virtually all vendors is based on SQL. Each vendor provides all the standard features of SQL. Most vendors also provide additional features of their own, called extensions to standard SQL. These extensions lead to portability issues when moving SQL-based applications across various RDBMS. Vendors attempt to distinguish their SQL versions through these extensions.
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COP 4610L: SQL Part 1 Page 4 Mark Llewellyn © History of SQL (cont.) The current version of ANSI standard for SQL is SQL- 2003 (also referred to as SQL3 as was SQL-99). This standard has also been accepted by ISO. Although many different extensions of SQL exist, we’ll look at the core SQL that will be found on any RDBMS that you will encounter. Whether you use Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, IBM’s DB2, Microsoft Access, MySQL, or any other well-established RDBMS, you’ll be able to get up to speed on that system with the information in this set of notes.
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COP 4610L: SQL Part 1 Page 5 Mark Llewellyn © SQL SQL is a complete relational database language in the sense
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sql - part 1 - COP 4610L: Applications in the Enterprise...

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