v37.docx - 8.3.4 Tracking Automatically Installed Packages One of the essential functionalities of apt is the tracking of packages installed only

v37.docx - 8.3.4 Tracking Automatically Installed Packages...

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8.3.4. Tracking Automatically Installed Packages One of the essential functionalities of apt is the tracking of packages installed only through dependencies. These packages are called automatic and often include libraries. With this information, when packages are removed, the package managers can compute a list of automatic packages that are no longer needed (because there are no manually installed packages depending on them). The command apt autoremove will get rid of those packages. Aptitude does Chapter 8 — Debian Package Management 199 not have this command because it removes them automatically as soon as they are identified. In all cases, the tools display a clear message listing the affected packages. It is a good habit to mark as automatic any package that you don’t need directly so that they are automatically removed when they aren’t necessary anymore. You can use apt-mark auto package to mark the given package as automatic, whereas apt-mark manual package does the opposite. aptitude markauto and aptitude unmarkauto work in the same way, although they offer more features for marking many packages at once (see section 8.2.7.1, “Aptitude” [page 190]). The console-based interactive interface of aptitude also makes it easy to review the automatic flag on many packages. You might want to know why an automatically installed package is present on the system. To get this information from the command line, you can use aptitude why package (apt and apt-get have no similar feature): $ aptitude why python-debian i aptitude Recommends apt-xapian-index i A apt-xapian-index Depends python-debian (>= 0.1.15) 8.3.5. Leveraging Multi-Arch Support All Debian packages have an Architecture field in their control information. This field can contain either “all” (for packages that are architecture-independent) or the name of the architecture that it targets (like amd64, or armhf). In the latter case, by default, dpkg will only install the package if its architecture matches the host’s architecture as returned by dpkg --print-architecture. This restriction ensures that you do not end up with binaries compiled for an incorrect architecture. Everything would be perfect except that (some) computers can run binaries for multiple architectures, either natively (an amd64 system can run i386 binaries) or through emulators. Enabling Multi-Arch Multi-arch support for dpkg allows users to define foreign architectures that can be installed on the current system. This is easily done with dpkg --add- architecture, as in the example below where the i386 architecture needs to be added to the amd64 system in order to run Windows applications using Wine5 . There is a corresponding dpkg --remove- architecture to drop support of a foreign architecture, but it can only be used when no packages of this architecture remain installed. # dpkg --print-architecture amd64 5 200 Kali Linux Revealed # wine it looks like wine32 is missing, you should install it. multiarch needs to be enabled first. as root, please execute ”dpkg --add-architecture i386 & apt-get update & apt-get install wine32”
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  • Summer '16
  • nushawan
  • Debian, Advanced Packaging Tool

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