{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

lecture_9_SAC_CarbonCycleII

lecture_9_SAC_CarbonCycleII - CarbonCycle:PartII...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Carbon Cycle: Part II Carbon Cycle: Part II Silvia 2/2/10 NPP in oceans Controls over NPP Carbon exchange in oceans Terrestrial sources of carbon:     Soil Respiration     Decomposition of organic matter     Methanogenesis  Ecosystem Carbon balance  Global Carbon Cycle
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Photosynthesis Photosynthesis 6 C0 2  + 6H 2 O          C 6 H 12 0 6   + 6 O 2    oxidized                   Reduced  Low energy             High energy
Image of page 2
Ways to measure NPP Terrestrial systems 1. Harvests of biomass over time 2.  Measurement of basal area increase+  litterfall production (+other measurable  biomass increases) 3. Satellite measurements of “greenness”  4. Eddy covariance tower measurements of  “net accumulation of carbon in the EE”
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov/about
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Roughly HALF of the earth’s     photosynthesis occurs in the    ocean Most of this is performed by phytoplankton Most of NPP occurs on coastal regions  and regions of upwelling but because the  open ocean is so large, it still accounts for  ~80% of oceans production NPP  Aquatic systems http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Experiments/ICE/Channel_Islands/Images/ice_phytoplankt on.jpg
Image of page 6
Global NPP  Oceans Standard product are based on MODIS chlorophyll and temperature data, SeaWiFS PAR, and  estimates of euphotic zone depth from a model developed by Morel and Berthon (1989) and based  on chlorophyll concentration. Monthly global ocean production for November 2002 was  3.68 Pg  (1 Pg  = 10**15 g.)
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
 Ways to measure NPP  Aquatic systems 1. variations in oxygen concentration within a sealed bottle (developed by Gaarder and Gran 1927) 2. incorporation of inorganic carbon 14 C in the form of sodium carbonate into organic matter (Steeman- Nielsen 1951). 3. Stable isotopes of Oxygen ( 16 O, 18 O and 17 O)   Bender et al. 1987; Luz and Barkan 2000). 4. fluorescence kinetics (technique still a research topic) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_production
Image of page 8
Global NPP Global NPP http://www.uni-klu.ac.at/socec/bilder/NPP0_600.png Which factors determine NPP??
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Multiple factors influence NPP Light Temperature Water Nutrients Disturbance Read pages 469-474
Image of page 10
Biome differences in NPP Biome differences in NPP
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Biome Differences in NPP (Terrestrial) Length of the growing season is the major factor that explains biome differences in NPP Differences in leaf area account for most of the variation in biome NPP within a growing season Leaf area, in turn, is determined by climate, soil resources, and time since disturbance Disturbance substantially modifies the relationship between NPP and climate
Image of page 12
Carbon Cycle
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Carbon exchange in oceans Carbon exchange in oceans
Image of page 14
Carbon Cycle
Image of page 15

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Three types of processes that 
Image of page 16
Image of page 17
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern