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Lecture_11_SAC_NutrientCyclingII_P&Scycles

Lecture_11_SAC_NutrientCyclingII_P&Scycles - N utr...

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Nutrient Cycling Part I I Nutrient Cycling Part I I Finish the N cycle Phosphorus cycle Sulfur cycle N and P in lake ecosystems Nutrient limitation in oceans SAC 2/9/2010
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Nitrogen Cycle Cycle Organic matter Dissolved organic nitrogen NH 4 + NO 3 - Mineralization Leaching Denitrification N deposition N fixation Microbes Immobilization N 2 NO N 2 O NH 3 Volatilization Leaching
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N inputs In pristine systems, biological N fixation is the main source Cultivation of N-fixing crops Humans have increased global N fixation by almost 3 X Fixation via fossil fuel emissions (N deposition) Industrial N fixation via Haber-Bosch We will talk more about the anthropogenic effects on the N cycle later!
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Human inputs to N cycle
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N limited ecosystem (accumulating N inputs) N saturated ecosystem (N inputs = N outputs)
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Changing Nitrogen Cycle Up to a point, increased N inputs stimulate plant growth and N accumulates in ecosystem Species composition may change in response to increases Eventually, the ecosystem saturates N inputs = N outputs as: N gas production from denitrification nitrate leaching to aquatic systems
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Changing N Cycle: Effects on Atmosphere N 2 O (nitrous oxide) N 2 O-nitrous oxide-is a potent greenhouse gas (296 x greater than CO 2 )
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THE NI TROGEN THE NI TROGEN CYCLE CYCLE
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The Phosphorus The Phosphorus Cycle Cycle
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The Phosphorus The Phosphorus Cycle Cycle
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The Phosphorus The Phosphorus Cycle Cycle 1.Which are the largest terrestrial and aquatic pools of P? 2.Which is the largest P input to oceans? 3. Name three differences between the P and the N cycle 4. Where is the P fertilizer coming from?
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Phosphorus cycle Phosphorus cycle Soil Organic matter Dissolved organic P PO 4 - Secondary minerals Occlusion microbes Parent material (rock) Erosion Dust Mineralization Leaching
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Characteristics of the Characteristics of the Phosphorus Cycle Phosphorus Cycle 2. (PO 4 3- ) is the available form to plants, and it does not undergo oxidation reduction reactions under most conditions 3. No gas forms of P
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