Joshua Canales - 06_-_Emancipation_and_the_Civil_War.docx -...

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Name Dat e Issued By Purpo se March 13, 1862 April 10, 1862 May 19, 1862 April 16, 1862 July 17, 1862 June 15, 1864 January 16, 1865 March 3, 1865 March 3, 1865 March 23, 1865
Why do you think most of these were passed by Congress? How successful do you think the Confederate law of March 1865 was? Why? What was the purpose of Section 5 of this law? Why do you think this was included? Which document was the most progressive to you? Why? Which Congressional law do you feel was the least progressive? Why ?
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Re Article –. All officers or persons in the military or naval service of the United States are prohibited from employing any Proclamation by the President Washington [ D.C. ] this nineteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation. Whereas there appears in the public prints, what purports to be a proclamation, of Major General Hunter, in the words and figures following, to wit: Head Quarters Department of the South, Hilton Head, S.C. May 19, 1862. General Orders N o 11.–The three States of Georgia, Florida and South Carolina, comprising the military department of the south, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the 25 th day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible; the persons in these three States–Georgia, Florida and South Carolina–heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. (Official) David Hunter, Major General Commanding. Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln, 19 May 1862, #90, Presidential Proclamations, series 23 Record Group 11, National Archives.
Joi Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, Th An Act for the Release of certain Persons held to Service or Labor in the District of Columbia April 16, 1862 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled , That all persons held to service or labor within the District of Columbia by reason of African descent are hereby discharged and freed of and from all claim to such service or labor; and from and after the passage of this act neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except for crime, whereof the party shall be duly convicted, shall hereafter exist in said District… Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That any person or persons who shall kidnap, or in any manner transport or procure to be taken out of said District, any person or persons discharged and freed by the provisions of this act, or any free person or persons with intent to re-enslave or sell such person or person into slavery, or shall re-enslave any of said freed persons, the person of persons so offending shall be deemed guilty of a felony,

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