Steve Jobs-Vision - STEVE JOBS A Dent in the Universe There\u2019s an old Wayne Gretzky quote that I love \u201cI skate to where the puck is going to be

Steve Jobs-Vision - STEVE JOBS A Dent in the Universe...

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STEVE JOBSA Dent in the UniverseThere’s an old Wayne Gretzky quote that I love: “I skate towhere the puck is going to be, not where it has been.” Andwe’ve always tried to do that at Apple. Since the verybeginning. And we always will.STEVE JOBSSteve Jobs didn’t set out to be a visionary. He once said thatwhen he and Steve Wozniak cofounded Apple, “we were outto build computers for our friends. That was all. No idea of acompany.”1The first Apple computer, the Apple I, was hand-built byWozniakin1976.TheintrovertedWozniak(nicknamed“Woz”—rhymes with Oz) was the technical wizard. Jobs hada background in programming, but his real assets wereextreme self-confidence, tons of ambition, and a charismaticpersonality.Jobs and Wozniak demonstrated their first computer at theHomebrew Computer Club in Palo Alto in July 1976. TheApple I would not be recognizable as a computer today. Itwasanakedcircuitboard—thecomputerbuyerhadto59
purchase a power supply, keyboard, video display, and case inorder to turn the Apple I into a working computer.Steve Jobs came up with a “creative financing” scheme to getthe company off the ground. He approached a local computerstore chain, the Byte Shop, and talked the owner into orderingfifty Apple computers at $500 each, cash on delivery. Then hetook the Byte Shop’s purchase order to an electronics supplierand talked the credit manager into selling him the parts onnet-thirty-day terms, using the purchase order as proof ofApple’s ability to pay. Woz delivered the computers to theByte Shop. Jobs collected the check, paid the parts supplier,and deposited a tidy profit in Apple’s bank account.While Jobs and Wozniak were building their company, SteveJobs’s visionary traits began to emerge. Jobs envisioned a truedesktop computer for the masses, with the circuitry hiddeninside a sleek plastic case—the Apple II. While seekingventure capital, Jobs met entrepreneur Mike Markkula, whoinvested $250,000 and became a one-third owner of Apple.Markkula helped Jobs and Wozniak take Apple from apartnership to a corporation.Jobs unveiled the Apple II in April 1977—and the Apple IIseries would go on to a phenomenal seventeen-year run. TheApple II was so successful that, by the summer of 1979,copier behemoth Xerox offered to invest $1 million in Apple.Jobs wanted Xerox’s money, but he wanted something elseevenmore.Connecticut-basedXerox maintaineda WestCoast R&D division called Palo Alto Research Center, orPARC. Jobs wanted a peek behind the curtain at PARC.Xerox agreed to give Jobs a tour of the top-secret facility in60
return for an opportunity to buy 100,000 shares of Apple atten dollars per share (a year later, those shares were wortheighteen times what Xerox paid).At PARC, Steve Jobs witnessed a demonstration of a newprogramming language. The computer screen was arranged inboxes called “windows.” A point-and-click device called a“mouse” opened various “windows” and performed tasks onthe screen. The PARC programmers called the system a

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