PRESS Malek et al Aerobically Trained Females 2004 (1)

PRESS Malek et al Aerobically Trained Females 2004 (1) - A...

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A New Nonexercise-Based V ˙ O 2max Equation for Aerobically Trained Females MOH H. MALEK 1 , TERRY J. HOUSH 1 , DALE E. BERGER 2 , JARED W. COBURN 1 , and TRAVIS W. BECK 1 1 University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE; and 2 Claremont Graduate University, Department of Psychology, Claremont, CA ABSTRACT MALEK, M. H., T. J. HOUSH, D. E. BERGER, J. W. COBURN, and T. W. BECK. A New Nonexercise-Based V ˙ O 2max Equation for Aerobically Trained Females. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. , Vol. 36, No. 10, pp. 1804–1810, 2004. Purpose: The purposes of the present study were to (a) modify previously published V ˙ O 2max equations using the constant error (CE) values for aerobically trained females, (b) cross-validate the modified equations to determine their accuracy for estimating V ˙ O 2max in aerobically trained females, (c) derive a new nonexercise-based equation for estimating V ˙ O 2max in aerobically trained females if the modified equations are found to be inaccurate, and (d) cross-validate the new V ˙ O 2max equation using the PRESS statistic and an independent sample of aerobically trained females. Methods: A total of 115 aerobically trained females (mean 6 SD: age 5 38.5 6 9.4 yr) performed a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer to determine actual V ˙ O 2max . The predicted V ˙ O 2max values from nine published equations were compared with actual V ˙ O 2max by examining the CE, standard error of estimate (SEE), validity coefficient (r), and total error (TE). Results: Cross-validation of the modified nonexercise-based equations on a random subsample of 50 subjects resulted in a %TE $ 13% of the mean of actual V ˙ O 2max . Therefore, the following nonexercise-based V ˙ O 2max equation was derived on a random subsample of 80 subjects: V ˙ O 2max (mL·min 2 1 ) 5 18.528 (weight in kg) 1 11.993 (height in cm) 2 17.197(age in yr) 1 23.522 (h·wk 2 1 of training) 1 62.118 (intensity of training using the Borg 6–20) 1 278.262 (natural log of years of training) 2 1375.878 (R 5 0.83, R 2 adjusted 5 0.67, and SEE 5 259 mL·min 2 1 ). Cross-validation of this equation on the remaining sample of 35 subjects resulted in a %TE of 10%. Conclusions: The nonexercise equation presented here is recommended over previously published equations for estimating V ˙ O 2max in aerobically trained females. Key Words: AEROBIC POWER REFERENCE VALUES, CARDIORESPIRATORY FIT- NESS, HIERARCHICAL LINEAR REGRESSION, MAXIMAL OXYGEN UPTAKE, MAXIMUM CYCLE ERGOMETRY, PRE- DICTION MODEL T he measure of maximal oxygen uptake (V ˙ O 2max )is used for many purposes including diagnostic tests, quantifying training intensity for aerobic exercise prescription, monitoring the effects of aerobic training pro- grams, and classifying individuals for health risk (2,3). Typically, direct determination of V
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PRESS Malek et al Aerobically Trained Females 2004 (1) - A...

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