Slides14-2010 -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
\documentclass{beamer}  \usepackage{beamerthemesplit}  \usetheme{Boadilla}  \usecolortheme{albatross}  \title[Large Sample Theory]{Large Sample Theory: Lecture XIV}  \author{Charles B. Moss}  \date{\today}  \begin{document}  \frame{\titlepage}  \section[Outline]{}  \frame{\tableofcontents}  \section{Basic Sample Theory}  \frame    \frametitle{Basic Sample Theory}    \begin{itemize}    \item The problems set up is that we want to discuss sample theory.       \begin{itemize}       \item First assume that we want to make an inference, either estimation or some test,  based on a sample.       \item We are interested in how well parameters or statistics based on that sample  represent the parameters or statistics of the whole population.       \end{itemize}    \item The complete statistical term is known as convergence.       \begin{itemize}       \item Specifically, we are interested in whether or not the statistics calculated on the  sample converge toward the population estimates.       \item Let $\left\{\ X_n \right\}\ $  be a sequence of samples.  We want to demonstrate  that statistics based on $\left\{\ X_n \right\}\ $ converge toward the population statistics  for $X$ . 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
     \end{itemize}    \end{itemize}  \frame    \begin{itemize}    \item Taking a slightly different tack:  The classical assumptions for ordinary least  squares (OLS) as presented in White, Halbert Asymptotic Theory for Econometricians.       \begin{itemize}       \item {\bf Theorem 1.1}: The following are the assumptions of the classical linear  model          \begin{itemize}          \item The model is known to be $y=X\beta + \epsilon$, $\beta < \infty$.          \item $X$ is a nonstochastic and finite $n \times k$ matrix.          \item $X'X$ is nonsingular for all $n \le k$.          \item ${\rm E}\left(\epsilon\right) = 0$.          \item $\epsilon \sim N\left( 0 , \sigma_0^2 I \right)$, $\sigma_0^2 < \infty$.          \end{itemize}       \end{itemize}    \end{itemize}  \frame    \begin{itemize}    \item Continued       \begin{itemize}       \item Given these assumptions, we can conclude that 
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Slides14-2010 -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online