Advanced XHTML & CSS - Audio & Video

Advanced XHTML & CSS - Audio & Video - CGS 2585:...

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CGS 2585: Advanced XHTML/CSS – Audio/Video Page 1 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing Spring 2011 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/csg2585/spr2011
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CGS 2585: Advanced XHTML/CSS – Audio/Video Page 2 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Different types of media, such as audio and video, can be used to make your web pages more interesting and informative for the visitor (they are also more fun to develop as well). Forms) introduced web page interactivity with the use of forms, but we’ll step the interactivity up a notch or two in this set of notes by discussing how to include both audio and video into your web pages. Web Multimedia And Interactivity
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CGS 2585: Advanced XHTML/CSS – Audio/Video Page 3 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn There are a number of ethical issues connected with placing audio and video into your web pages. In general, you need to obtain the rights (i.e., a license) from either the creator or the copyright owner before you can publish web pages including such material. Again, as we have mentioned before, in an educational setting, you are allowed much more leeway in utilizing such material. However, be aware of the consequences of using copyrighted material without license in a non-educational setting. Web Multimedia And Interactivity
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CGS 2585: Advanced XHTML/CSS – Audio/Video Page 4 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Web browsers are designed to display web pages, . gif, .jpeg, and .png images among others. When the media is not one of these types, the browser will search for a plug-in or helper application which is designed to display the file type. When the browser cannot find a plug-in or helper application on the user’s computer, it will generally ask the user if they want to save the file to their computer. The user may already have a program that will view the file, or they will be unable to view the file until they find a compatible program. Helper Applications and Plug-Ins
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Page 5 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn In order for visitor’s to your web site to have a good experience, use media files that are supported by the most common helper applications and plug-ins (see next page). A helper application is a program that can handle a particular file type (such as . wav or .mp3 ) to allow the user to open the special file. The helper application runs in a separate window from the browser. A newer and more common method is for the browser to invoke a plug-in application. The plug-in can run directly in the browser window so that the visitor can open media objects within the web page. Helper Applications and Plug-Ins
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Advanced XHTML & CSS - Audio & Video - CGS 2585:...

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