Cascading Style Sheets - Part 1

Cascading Style Sheets - Part 1 - CGS 2585:...

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CGS 2585: CSS – Part 1 Page 1 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing Spring 2011 Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) – Part 1 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cgs2585/spr2011
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CGS 2585: CSS – Part 1 Page 2 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn In 1996 the W3C recommended the adoption of a standard set to style sheets, Cascading Style Sheets level 1 (CSS1). The original purpose of CSS was to provide HTML authors with more formatting support and give them a way to apply uniform styles to multiple documents. Cascading Style Sheets level 2 (CSS2), introduced in 1998, included additional features and functionality. CSS work with XHTML the same way they work with HTML. Web browser support is widespread with Netscape Navigator 4.5 and above, and Internet Explorer 3.0 and above all supporting CSS. Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)
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CGS 2585: CSS – Part 1 Page 3 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn The primary reason for using CSS is to separate a document’s content from its presentation. In so doing it provides the document author with much greater control over the document’s format. Keeping the content and presentation information separate also allows you to change your presentation layout or method without having to modify the documents themselves, and allows you to apply one style sheet to any number of documents. For example, an organization could produce a price list document and then develop different style sheets depending on the type of user who is viewing the content whether they are using a web browser or a palm pilot. Why Use Cascading Style Sheets?
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Page 4 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Web development is rapidly heading toward this idea of separating content from presentation. The XML family of technologies already clearly defines the boundaries between content and presentation, as we’ve already discussed. XHTML Strict does not provide support for many of the strictly presentational elements, such as HTML’s <font> element. The strictly presentational elements that are part of the XHTML Transitional and XHTML Frameset versions of XHTML 1.0, including the <font> element, are primarily included for backward compatibility with existing HTML content. Because XHTML Strict does not include many of these presentational elements in its element set, it relies on style sheets to define the presentational styles. XHTML Strict most closely represents the direction XHTML is heading. The W3C recommends that new content development should center around XHTML Strict whenever possible in order to be most compatible with future technologies. Separating Content From Presentation
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This note was uploaded on 07/16/2011 for the course CGS 2585 taught by Professor Llewellyn during the Spring '11 term at University of Central Florida.

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Cascading Style Sheets - Part 1 - CGS 2585:...

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