Introduction - CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing Spring...

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CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing (Introduction) Page 1 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing Spring 2011 Introduction – Part 1 School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cgs2585/spr2011
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CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing (Introduction) Page 2 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn This course is all about writing for the Internet. Specifically, its about writing for that part of the Internet call the World Wide Web (or “the web” for short). Although the Internet and the Web are often used interchangeably, they are, in fact, different. The Internet includes a number of computer network capabilities, including email, file sharing, local area networks (LANs), instant messaging, gaming networks, chat rooms, bulletin board systems, electronic data transfer, and so on. The Web refers specifically to Internet files that are accessible from various electronic servers by a Web browser and displayed as screen pages on your computer or other Web-enabled device. Introduction To Desktop/Internet Publishing
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CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing (Introduction) Page 3 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn The Internet traces its roots to a project of the U.S. Dept. of Defense’s then named Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) in the 1960s. The ARPANET project was intended to support DoD research on computer networking. – When this project began, there had only been a few small experimental networks providing communication between geographically dispersed computers from different manufacturers running different operating systems. The purpose of ARPANET was to create a much larger network, both in order to electronically connect DoD- sponsored researchers and to experiment with and develop tools for heterogeneous computer networking. What is the Internet?
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CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing (Introduction) Page 4 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn ARPANET was launched in 1969 and by the end of that year consisted of 4 computers at 4 sites running 4 different operating systems. – The first site in ARPANET was at UCLA. ARPANET grew steadily, but because it was restricted to DoD-funded organizations and was a research project, it was never large. When many ARPANET nodes were split off to form a separate network called MILNET in 1983, there were only 113 nodes in the entire ARPANET network (mostly universities). What is the Internet?
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CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing (Introduction) Page 5 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Despite the relatively small number of machines actually on the ARPANET, the benefits of networking were becoming known to a wide audience. For
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Introduction - CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing Spring...

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