JavaScript - Part 1

JavaScript - Part 1 - CGs 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing...

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CGS 2585: JavaScript – Part 1 Page 1 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn CGs 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing Spring 2011 Introduction To JavaScript – Part 1 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cgs2585/spr2011
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CGS 2585: JavaScript – Part 1 Page 2 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Before we go any further let’s get one thing very clear: JavaScript is not Java! JavaScript is a scripting language. (XHTML is a mark-up language.) JavaScript was originally developed by Brendan Eich of Netscape under the name Mocha , later renamed to LiveScript . The change of name from LiveScript to JavaScript occurred in a co-marketing deal between Netscape and Sun in exchange for Netscape bundling Sun’s Java runtime environment with their browser, which was the dominate browser at the time. The key design principles in JavaScript are inherited from the Self programming language, although JavaScript copies many of the names and naming conventions of Java and shares a common C-like syntax with Java. To avoid trademark issues, Microsoft named its dialect of the language Jscript. Netscape submitted JavaScript to ECMA International (European Computer Manufacturer’s Association) for standardization resulting in the standardized version named ECMAScript. Using JavaScript, you can incorporate techniques and effects that will make your Web pages come alive for the visitor allowing them a great deal of interaction with your site. We’ll examine many aspects of JavaScript as we go along, but first some background material. Introduction to JavaScript
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CGS 2585: JavaScript – Part 1 Page 3 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Server-side scripts are programs that reside on a Web server and are executed on behalf of a client (in response to their requests typically from elements in Web pages). For example, in a future assignment you will be utilizing a server-side script (written in PHP which is also a server-side scripting language) to process the contents of your XHTML form. Server-side and Client-side Programming BROWSER Client Webserver 1. Form data sent to program on server for processing. 2. Results sent back to the client for display.
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Page 4 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Client-side scripts are programs that reside on the client’s machine (they are downloaded to your machine as part of the Web browser’s cache memory) and are executed on behalf of the client’s request. Server-side and Client-side Programming
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JavaScript - Part 1 - CGs 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing...

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