XHTML - Part 1

XHTML - Part 1 - CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing...

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CGS 2585: XHTML – Part 1 Page 1 © Mark Llewellyn CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing Spring 2011 XHTML – Part 1 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cgs2585/spr2011
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CGS 2585: XHTML – Part 1 Page 2 © Mark Llewellyn A markup language is simply a set of rules that defines the layout, format, or structure of text within a document. After markup instructions are added to a document, the document must be read, or processed, by a program that knows how to interpret the markup elements. Markup languages existed long before the World Wide Web. They were used primarily in the publishing industry prior to their adaptation to computer programming. Work began in the 1960s to develop a standardized document markup language that would be platform independent. Overview of Markup Languages
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CGS 2585: XHTML – Part 1 Page 3 © Mark Llewellyn • The Standard Generalized Mark Language (SGML) was the result of this initiative and was the first standardized markup language to gain acceptance. • It wasn’t until the Web exploded in popularity in the mid-1990s that the benefits of an open standard for markup languages became overwhelmingly apparent. Overview of Markup Languages
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CGS 2585: XHTML – Part 1 Page 4 © Mark Llewellyn SGML is the ancestor of, and provides the framework for, current Web markup languages, including XHTML, XML, and HTML. SGML was developed as a markup language for large documents, such as technical documentation. It was adopted as an international standard by the International Organization for Standards (ISO) in 1986, and has been widely used by many industries, including the automotive industry, the health care industry, the IRS, and the US Department of Defense, for large scale documentation projects. SGML is extremely complex, and thus very expensive. SGML has proved useful mainly to organizations that have the expertise and budget to implement the expansive SGML specification. Overview of Markup Languages
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Page 5 © Mark Llewellyn When the World Wide Web was in its infancy in the late 1980s and early 1990s, SGML was the perfect tool for building the markup language that would be used to create documents for this new medium. Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) was developed as a lightweight SGML by researchers at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) in the early 1990s. CERN had been involved with working on the SGML specification for many years. HTML was much smaller than SGML and gained widespread acceptance very quickly. It provided content developers with a portable document format that was not tied to any particular program or platform, and being an open standard, it was completely free to use. Overview of Markup Languages
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XHTML - Part 1 - CGS 2585: Desktop/Internet Publishing...

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