measurement summary - 1.1 The Realm of Physics The order of...

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1.1 The Realm of Physics The order of magnitude is the nearest power of 10 after first writing in standard form and then rounding off to the nearest 1, 10, 100, 1000, etc. 230 is second order of magnitude. 790 is third order. 8000 is 4th order. Sizes from 10 -15 m to 10 +25 m (sub-nuclear particles to extent of the visible universe). Masses from 10 -30 kg to 10 +50 kg (electron to mass of the universe). Times from 10 -23 s to 10 +18 s (passage of light across a nucleus to the age of the universe ). The difference in orders of magnitude between two values with the same units is found by dividing the two values. 1.2 Measurement and Uncertainties The fundamental units are kilogram, meter, second, ampere, mole and kelvin. Derived units are formed by multiplying and dividing fundamental units. The speed unit is derived from dividing metres by seconds. Units can be converted from one to another by multiplying or dividing by the appropriate factor. An hours is equal to 3600 seconds. To convert metres per second to kilometers per hour, multiply by 3.6. The accepted way of writing derived units is to use negative indices where required e.g. m s -1 for speed. Prefixes are used when numbers fall in certain ranges e.g. 2300 J = 2.3 kiloJoules nano n = 10
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This note was uploaded on 07/13/2011 for the course PHYS 2287 taught by Professor Jamesinstor during the Spring '11 term at University of Massachusetts Boston.

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measurement summary - 1.1 The Realm of Physics The order of...

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