3 Karl Marx - KarlMarx(18181883 theworld.Thepoint,however,istochange it Life&Times BorninPrussia(1818)

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style  7/15/11 “Philosophers have only sought to interpret  the world. The point, however, is to change  it.” Karl Marx (1818-1883)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 7/15/11 Born in Prussia (1818) into a middle-class family Finished a phd in philosophy in 1841 on Hegel Eventually forced to leave Germany for political  reasons in 1843, where he met Friedrich Engels, his  collaborator and benefactor Marx is expelled from France in 1845, moving to  Brussels. He withdraws from political activity around  1852, until 1864. Publishes  Kapital ’s first edition in 1867
Background image of page 2
 7/15/11 Why Marx is not a idealist Marx’s focus is on empirical analysis; because  humans “begin to produce their means of subsistence,  a step which is conditioned by … organization” Marx is asserting that people produce ideas about the world  based on their experience and observation  within  a given set of  structures. For Marx, social theory should focus on how people  influence and are influenced by their material  conditions.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 7/15/11 The Method: Dialectical Materialism Materialism  is the placing of emphasis on physical  and psychological needs rather than ideas (idealism). Being a student of GWF Hegel, Marx adopted Hegel’s  dialectical  method for his own purposes of historical  analysis.
Background image of page 4
 7/15/11 Four characteristics of the dialectic First, society is a  system of interrelated parts which  form a integrated whole. For example, class relations are reflected in the economy, health  care, crime, religion, education… Although Marx places emphasis on economic factors as “big  causes,” it is not the only cause. Second, social change is inherent in all societies  because people make history by satisfying ever- changing needs. Not only are parts of society connected, they contain their own 
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 7/15/11 The Dialectic, pt. 2 Third, social change evolves in recognizable  directions. Just as a seed gives rise to a flower, the  historical development of complex social structures  such as capitalism are inherent in the previous  structures. Marx’s vision is of a utopian communist society (no relation to  the Communist Parties that actually exist) Fourth, freely acting people shape history, based on  class conflict .
Background image of page 6
 7/15/11 Marx’s microsociology One of Marx’s fundamental premises is that human  potential contradicts with the way we work in  capitalist society Human potential: we are “ensembles of social  relations”: our potential is intertwined with our  specific social relations and our institutional context. Human nature therefore varies historically and socially.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/13/2011 for the course SOC 320 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '08 term at University of Louisville.

Page1 / 24

3 Karl Marx - KarlMarx(18181883 theworld.Thepoint,however,istochange it Life&Times BorninPrussia(1818)

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online