Analyzing Psychological Disorders

Analyzing Psychological Disorders - 1 Analyzing...

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1 Analyzing Psychological Disorders Analyzing Psychological Disorders Tonia Pieper Axia College at University of Phoenix
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2 Analyzing Psychological Disorders Schizophrenia is a severe and disabling brain disorder characterized by  abnormalities in the perception or expression of reality.  It most commonly manifests as  auditory hallucinations, paranoid or bizarre delusions, or disorganized speech and  thinking with significant social or occupational dysfunction.  Onset of symptoms typically  occurs in young adulthood, with approximately 0.4-0.6% of the population affected.  Diagnosis is based on the patient’s self-reported experiences and observed behavior.   The part of the brain that is affected by schizophrenic  showed functional  abnormalities and corresponding gray matter deficits in several brain regions associated  with regulating emotion and processing human voices.  More specifically, large  coinciding brain clusters were found in the left and right middle temporal and superior  temporal part of the brain. ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Schizophrenia )   While the reliability of the diagnosis introduces difficulties in measuring the  relative effect of genes and environment, evidence suggests that genetic and  environmental factors can act in combination to result in schizophrenia.  Evidence  suggests that the diagnosis of schizophrenia has a significant heritable component but  that onset is significantly influenced by environmental factors or stressors.  The idea of  an inherent vulnerability in some people, which can be unmasked by biological, 
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3 Analyzing Psychological Disorders psychological, or environmental stressors, is known as the stress-diathesis model.  The  idea that biological, psychological and social factors are all important is known as the  “biopsychosocial” model. ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Schizophrenia) It is proposed that the basic disturbance in schizophrenia corresponds to a  disruption of the normal relationship between stored material and current sensory input.  The link between information processing disturbances and their biological bases may be  facilitated by the use of paradigms derived from animal learning theory.  A model for the  emergence of schizophrenic symptoms is presented.  The core cognitive abnormality  may result from a disturbance at any point in the neural circuit involved in the prediction  of subsequent sensory input.  Evidence is also accumulating that communication and  coordination failures between different brains regions may account for a wide range of  problems in schizophrenia, from psychosis to cognitive dysfunction.  (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119260092/abstract)
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Analyzing Psychological Disorders - 1 Analyzing...

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