Class 4_Americas Founding and Constutiton II_091409

Class 4_Americas Founding and Constutiton II_091409 -...

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Political Science 1101 American Government: Practices and Values Class 4: America’s Founding & the Constitution II
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From Last Class American political culture - myth or reality? Liberty Individualism Equality Democracy/self-government
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From Last Class (cont.) Why did the colonists revolt against the British monarchy? Motivated by principles : “natural rights of man” (e.g. John Locke, Declaration of Independence, “give me liberty, or give me death”). Motivated by economic interests : economic grievances and “no taxation without representation.”
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From Last Class (cont.) How did the colonists decide on a new form of government? Distrust of government and lack of national unity: Articles of Confederation and its weaknesses. The U.S. Constitution and the two-fold dilemma of representation: Large vs. small states : VA Plan, NJ Plan, and the Great Compromise/CT Compromise. Slave states vs. non-slave states : slavery and the 3/5 ths Compromise. Distinguishing features of the Constitution.
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Designing the U.S. Constitution: General Observations About Politics It is easier to hold grievances privately than to act collectively upon them. Collective action is usually the result of both principles and interests . It is easier to form a coalition to oppose something than to agree on what should replace it. Fear and threat to political stability are great motivators for action and change.
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Today’s Questions What issues did the Federalists and Antifederalists fight about in ratifying the U.S. Constitution? Who won and lost in the shaping of the Constitution? Which issues did the Constitution leave unresolved? How were the core values of American political culture – liberty, individualism, equality, and democracy – incorporated (or not) in the Constitution?
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The Fight for Ratification Article VI of the Constitution: 9 states (out of 13) were required to ratify the Constitution before it could take effect. Ratification fights were waged in the individual states, in 13 separate campaigns. Two opposing camps: Federalists vs. Antifederalists .
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Federalists Young, fought in the American Revolution for equality. Key constituents: property owners, merchants, creditors. Favored strong national government, feared “excessive democracy.” Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, and George Washington. Published their views in papers under the pseudonym “Publius.”
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Antifederalists Older politicians from colonial governing class. Key constituents: small farmers, debtors, frontiersmen, shopkeepers. Favored state government, feared concentrated power. James Wilson, Elbridge Gerry, George Mason, Patrick
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This note was uploaded on 07/14/2011 for the course POL 1001 taught by Professor Xxx during the Fall '09 term at CUNY Baruch.

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Class 4_Americas Founding and Constutiton II_091409 -...

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