Class 5_Federalism_091609

Class 5_Federalism_091609 - Political Science 1101 American...

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Political Science 1101 American Government: Practices and Values Class 5: Federalism and the Devolution Revolution
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Did you read the readings on federalism assigned for today? 12 43% 57% 1. Yes 2. No
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Did you download today’s lecture slides before you came to class? 12 76% 24% 1. Yes 2. No
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Did you vote in yesterday’s primary election? 12 98% 2% 1. Yes 2. No
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From Last Class The struggle over ratifying the Constitution. Federalists vs. Antifederalists: Large/diverse republic vs. small/homogeneous republics. Strong national government vs. greater state autonomy. Preventing tyranny. Separation of powers and checks and balances. A Bill of Rights. The Constitution as a living document: Slavery. Women. Tensions over core American values: liberty vs. equality vs. democracy.
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Today’s Questions What is federalism? How has the federalist framework in the U.S. evolved over time? What explains the increased power of the federal government over the states? What are the advantages and disadvantages of federalism? What are some current political issues where state (and local) interests have diverged from, and conflicted with, federal interests?
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Federalism Defined Federal system: a system of government in which power is divided between a central (federal) government and regional governments (states). The regional governments receive at least partial jurisdiction on policy matters and institutional protection of this jurisdiction. Peterson : effectively, this means that states have: Independently elected representatives. Autonomous ability to raise taxes. Examples : United States, Mexico, Australia, India, Germany.
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Federalism Compared: Alternative Divisions of Sovereignty Unitary system : a system of government in which all power rests with the national government; regional governments have little or no power independent of the national government. Examples : France, Great Britain, Italy, Sweden, Japan. Confederate system : a system of government in which most or all power rests with regional governments that constitute a nation; if a central government exists, it is weak and has few independent powers. Examples : historical U.S., Native American tribes, Switzerland, international organizations.
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Federalism Compared: Simplified Diagrams
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Basis for Federalism Constitutional: Article I, Section 8 – national powers : 17 expressed powers granted to Congress.
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Class 5_Federalism_091609 - Political Science 1101 American...

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