I.3-Legal Basics for HR

I.3-Legal Basics for HR - Introduction, Lecture 3:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND THE LAW Prof. John Kammeyer-Mueller MGT 4301 Introduction, Lecture 3: Introduction to Human Resources
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Plan Where are we? Know how HR fits the company Where do we want to be today? Understand the basics of employment discrimination law Learn about who and what is covered How will we know how we’re doing? Describe two historical arguments for and against civil rights laws Respondeat superior/vicarious liability The difference between protected classes and protected groups What is the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and why was it passed? What is the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and why was it passed? What is the Americans with Disabilities Act and why was it passed? Introduction, Lecture 3: Introduction to Human Resources
Background image of page 2
Metrics for Legal Policies and Procedures Costs Staff time to comply with legalistic policies and procedures Lawsuits following legal violations Services Clearly articulated policies and procedures Widely disseminated to all employees Performance Increased focus on work Employee productivity as a result of clarity Attitudes Improved satisfaction and commitment on the job Reduced tension among employees Introduction, Lecture 3: Introduction to Human Resources
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Does Fortune Favor the Beautiful? Relationship between attractiveness and job-related outcomes 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 Hiring Promotion Performance Outcome category Mean uncorrected d-score Introduction, Lecture 3: Introduction to Human Resources
Background image of page 4
Own Interest Economist V. Bhaskar analysed 69 episodes of Shafted, which aired on Dutch TV in 2002, in which the highest-scoring player picks a contestant to eliminate at the end of each round. It is to your advantage to pick a high scoring partner. Although the least attractive players scored no worse in the show than others, they were twice as likely to be eliminated in the first round. In the final round of Shafted, the last two players vie for an accumulated pot of money. Each player must opt to share the prize or attempt to grab it all for themselves. If one player opts to grab while one opts to share, the grabber takes the lot. If both try to grab, they both leave empty-handed, so game theory dictates that the leading contestant should pick a fellow finalist who is likely to cooperate. Even though attractiveness was found to have no bearing on cooperativeness, the leader often elected to play the final round with the most attractive of their remaining rivals. In 13 shows, these looks-based decisions even overrode a simple imperative to choose their highest-scoring rival, which would have led to increases in the ultimate prize fund. In these cases, the prize was €350 lower than it could have been, on average. Source: New Scientist, August 2008
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 61

I.3-Legal Basics for HR - Introduction, Lecture 3:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online