Understanding What People Are 1

Understanding What People Are 1 - I ndividual Diffe nce in...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Individual Differences in Organizations Prof. John Kammeyer-Mueller MGT 5246
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Who are you? Think about how you would introduce yourself to someone What are the things you would tell them so that they would know the real you? What are the things about you that make you unique? Think also about people you like What are the ways you would describe your friends? What characteristics do they have that make them who they are? How are you similar? How are you different?
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Person or Situation= The ultimate personality test: Driving You are driving in to work one day and the car in front of you is driving very slowly. You need to be at work early because you are behind in your schedule for the month. You cannot pass the car because there is only one lane. What reactions might a person have? Emotional reactions Behavioral reactions How do personality traits play into this situation? Emotions
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Person or Situation= Trait or State? Traits Shown across a variety of situations (global) Shown across a variety of time periods (stable) Brought about by genetic explanations or childhood experiences Explain why not all people act the same way in the same situation States A specific event triggers them (local) Subside after the trigger is gone (unstable) Brought about by specific external factors in the environment Explain why people generally act in similar ways to the same situation
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The Continuum of Traits and States Moods Low stability High stability Global Local States Angry Talkative Motivated Happy Traits Hostility Extroversion Achievement motivation Optimism
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Thinking About How You’ve Changed Think back to your childhood Imagine a time when you were doing something that is a lot like what you would do now; something that really gets at your enduring personality Now imagine something that’s different about how you used to act when you were a kid that’s very different than you’d act now How are you similar? How are you different? I have a research hypothesis to test You can tell a lot about what a person is going to be like as an adult based on what they were like as a child
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Longitudinal Stability of Personality as a Factor of Time From Scheurger, Zarrella, & Hotz, 1989; used 89 independent samples in this analysis
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Stability of Core Affect and Personality Scores Personality scores are related to perceptions of life events, so personality and situation are co- determinant This is consistent with the interactionist model of personality Vaidya, Gray, Haig, &
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Test-Retest Meta Analysis of Self-Esteem Trzesniewski, Donnellan, & Robins, 2003
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Why Is Self-Esteem Consistent Over Time? Think of reasons why people who have high self-esteem tend
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This note was uploaded on 07/18/2011 for the course MAN 4504 taught by Professor Benson during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Understanding What People Are 1 - I ndividual Diffe nce in...

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