Understanding What People Are 2

Understanding What People Are 2 - I ndividual Diffe nce in...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Individual Differences in Organizations Prof. John Kammeyer-Mueller MGT 5246
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Diversity in Organizations Diversity can be conceptualized at two broad level Surface-level diversity: differences in easily perceived characteristics like gender, race, ethnicity, age, or disability status Deep-level diversity: differences in values, personality, and work preferences that become more important as people get to know one another When are surface level characteristics likely to be
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Diversity in Organizations Discrimination Noting a difference between things Unfair discrimination Making judgments about individuals based on stereotypes regarding their demographic groups
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Age and Organizational Behavior Myths Older workers are less productive in general Older workers have been shown to have stagnant or out of date skills Older workers tend to be resistant to new technology Facts Older workers typically perform about as well as younger workers on most tasks Some skills do deteriorate with age, but other skills often step in to compensate for these losses Older workers are less likely to turnover
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Gender and Organizational Behavior Myths Women are not as good at problem-solving tasks Women are less competitive than men Women and men are equally good at all cognitive tasks Facts Men and women are equally good at problem solving in general Women are more agreeable than men and less aggressive, but are equally competitive Women appear to be better at tasks requiring synthesis and combination, whereas men are better at tasks requiring pure visual-spatial skills
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Race/ethnicity and Organizational Myths We have achieved a completely post-racial society Some groups are more likely to be absent or have higher accident rates at work Minorities always prefer affirmative action programs, whites always oppose them Facts People do still tend to favor colleagues of their own race in many contexts (although this effect is shrinking over time) Group differences in absence and accident rates have not been found Preference for AA programs is more about how they are perceived than about group differences
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Strategies for Improving Diversity Attraction, selection, development, and retention Advertisements showing diverse groups of employees are preferred by minorities, and many whites as well Use of well-defined protocols for making selection decisions tends to minimize bias Developing a positive diversity climate tends to improve sales performance among minority employees Nearly all workers prefer organizations with a positive
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Strategies for Improving Diversity Effective programs The focus is on fairness, since nearly everyone is in favor of fair procedures Solicit feedback and participation from everyone affected by the decision Ensure objective information is used to make decisions Minimize biases and personal preferences/favoritism Allow employees to appeal decisions they don’t like
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Understanding What People Are 2 - I ndividual Diffe nce in...

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