HCR210wk1ckpt - In order of a living will to be in effect...

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HCR/210 Week one checkpoint Due April 29,2011 The patient self-determination act plays a major role in health care delivery. This act gives patients the right to determine what happens in the event they can no longer speak for themselves. Once a patient uses advanced directives there is nothing a physician, family member, or anyone else can do to go against the patients wishes. When a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) is in effect nothing is to be done to keep them alive, no IV’s, nothing to eat and no medicine. Once a DNR is in place no one can go against it without facing legal consequences. A health care proxy gives someone other than the patient the right to make decision on behalf of the patient. This is so there are not too many people giving different orders. A living will is documents stating the patients own wishes when on their deathbed.
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Unformatted text preview: In order of a living will to be in effect two doctors must agree that the patient is near death. A power of attorney for health care gives the doctor of the patient’s choice the power to make health care decisions. Patients that are organ donors have given permission for physicians to donate their organs in the case of their death. Knowing if a patient is an organ donor is important because organs go straight to another patient. If the physicians do not know the patient is an organ donor the right steps needed to keep the organs alive may not be taken. This act has made managing patient records important. Keeping important documents like these in the front of a patient’s record is important so that anyone who is looking at the records can see it. These documents make updating patients records important....
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This note was uploaded on 07/14/2011 for the course HCR 210 taught by Professor Byrnes during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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