Unit 11 3 - Unit 11 Part Unit 11 Part 3 Public Health Surveillance Public Health Surveillance Health Surveillance Ongoing systematic collection

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Unit 11 – Part 3 Unit 11 Part 3 Public Health Surveillance Dr. A. Sanchez-Anguiano Public Health Surveillance “Ongoing systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health data essential to the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health practice closely integrated with the timely health practice, closely integrated with the timely dissemination of these data to those who need to know” C t f Di C t l 1986 -- Centers for Disease Control, 1986. Definition of Definition of Public Health Surveillance “Information for Action” ± The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of outcome-specific data. Timely dissemination of the data to those ± Timely dissemination of the data to those responsible for prevention and control activities (report to central agencies: local/state/fed). ± For use in the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health practice evaluation of public health practice. Surveillance Systems Historical Development of Public Health Surveillance History of Surveillance Before and During Middle Ages ± Hippocrates’ ideas laid foundation for surveillance ± idea of observing and recording facts, analyzing, reasoning. ± Bubonic plague ± 1st.real PH action resulting from surveillance: ships ± Evolution of current concepts of PH surveillance ± evolved from PH action to control and prevent disease ± in late middle ages, governments in Western Europe got responsibilities for health protection and care. ± rudimentary system of monitoring illness led to ± regulations against polluting streets and public water, ± instructions for burial and food handling, ± provision of some types of health care. History of Surveillance in the 17th Century ± Semblance of organized health care systems in a stable government (1st. in Roman empire). ± Thomas Sydenham worked classification system for disease ± Measurement methods developed in 17th century ± Gottfried Von Leibnitz (1680): numerical analysis in mortality statistics. ± John Graunt (late 17th century) published Natural and Political Observation. ± Made Upon the Bills of Mortality and developed fundamental principles (disease- specific death counts, death rates, concept of disease patterns).
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History of Surveillance in the 18th Century ± Development of concepts of PH surveillance ± Gottfried Achenwall (1740’s-50’s) introduced term statistics ± US development: Rhode Island passed an act: ± requiring tavern keepers to report contagious disease among patrons (1741). ± 1743 passed a broader law: smallpox, yellow fever, cholera. ± Johann P. Frank (1766) developed system of police medicine in Germany medicine in Germany ± covering school health, ± injury prevention, ± maternal and child health, ± public water and sewage ± delineating measures to protect PH History of Surveillance in the 19th Century ± William Farr (1807-1883): ± Registrar General’ office of England and Wales ± Collected Vital Statistics ± Provided vital statistics data to J. Snow (cholera) ±
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This note was uploaded on 07/15/2011 for the course PHC 6000 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '08 term at University of South Florida - Tampa.

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Unit 11 3 - Unit 11 Part Unit 11 Part 3 Public Health Surveillance Public Health Surveillance Health Surveillance Ongoing systematic collection

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