Math 203_Lecture 7

Math 203_Lecture 7 - Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7:...

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Unformatted text preview: Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 Abbas Khalili Department of Mathematics and Statistics McGill University May 11, 2011 Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 1/4 7 Chapter 5 CONTINUOUS RANDOM VARIABLES Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 2/4 7 Introduction A continuous random variable can take infinitely many values. Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 3/4 7 Introduction A continuous random variable can take infinitely many values. Suppose the temperature in a certain city in the month of June in the past five years has always been between 25 to 35 centigrade. Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 3/4 7 Introduction A continuous random variable can take infinitely many values. Suppose the temperature in a certain city in the month of June in the past five years has always been between 25 to 35 centigrade. The temperature can take any value between the ranges 25 to 35 . Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 3/4 7 Introduction A continuous random variable can take infinitely many values. Suppose the temperature in a certain city in the month of June in the past five years has always been between 25 to 35 centigrade. The temperature can take any value between the ranges 25 to 35 . The temperature on any day may be 27 . 15 or 27 . 20 or it may take any value between 27 . 15 and 27 . 20 . Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 3/4 7 Introduction A continuous random variable can take infinitely many values. Suppose the temperature in a certain city in the month of June in the past five years has always been between 25 to 35 centigrade. The temperature can take any value between the ranges 25 to 35 . The temperature on any day may be 27 . 15 or 27 . 20 or it may take any value between 27 . 15 and 27 . 20 . When we say that the temperature is 30 , it means that the temperature lies between somewhere say 29 . 5 to 30 . 5 . Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 3/4 7 Therefore, for continuous random variables we will only be able to assign probabilities to intervals but not for any particular point. Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 4/4 7 More examples The computer time (in seconds) required to process a certain program. Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 5/4 7 More examples The computer time (in seconds) required to process a certain program. The amount of rain falls in the certain city. Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7: Math 203 p. 5/4 7 More examples The computer time (in seconds) required to process a certain program. The amount of rain falls in the certain city. The amount of water passing through a pipe connected with a high level reservoir....
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Math 203_Lecture 7 - Principles of Statistics 1 Lecture 7:...

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