lec 1 meiosis_posted

lec 1 meiosis_posted - Welcome to Genetics 466 Instructors...

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Welcome to Genetics 466 Instructors Allen Laughon (Parts 1-3) alaughon@wisc.edu Chris Day (Part 4) cday2@wisc.edu Ashley Klein (discussion sections) aeklein2@wisc.edu Learn@UW Syllabus: schedule, text, reading and problem assignments, office hours and contact information Lecture notes will be posted Discussion sections Tues, Wed 11:45-12:35, room 1441 Genetics/Biotech Exam dates: June 23, July 7, July 21, Aug 4 (all Thursdays) Exams are at regular class time and room but are 10:20-12:20 (2 hrs). Grade is based on average of four exams. Homework is not collected. Makeup exams are discouraged and must be arranged with the instructor well in advance of the exam date. Drop deadline: Friday, July 15 th
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Central Dogma: DNA RNA protein Transmission Genetics Topic Areas Genome Variation p 2 + 2pq + q 2 = 1 Quantitative & Population Genetics
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& Each cell contains chromosomes, and chromosomes contain genes Basic concepts: visualizing cells, chromosomes and DNA
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nucleus cytoplasm DNA mRNA 5& 5& 3& transcription translation RNA polymerase protein Basic concepts: protein sequences are encoded in DNA The central dogma of molecular biology: DNA RNA protein catalysis, cell structure
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mutation fruit fly gene for red eye color red pigment in cells of eye expression replication (heredity) red eyed progeny white eyed progeny Basic concepts: three fundamental properties of genes (evolution) (development, physiology)
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Figure 2- 1 8 part 1 Basic concepts: DNA replication generates faithful copies
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Homologous chromosomes Homologous chromosomes Non-homologous chromosomes centromeres chromosome arms Basic Concepts: Homologous vs. nonhomologous chromosomes sister chromatids All eukaryotes have multiple chromosomes. For example, humans have 23 different chromosomes. As in all diploid organsims, each is present in two copies, one from each parent. Each chromosome pair (the two copies) are referred to as homologous chromosomes . They have the same genes in the same arrangement and are nearly identical in DNA sequence. Chromosomes with different genes are said to be non-homologous . A karyogram of giemsa-stained metaphase chromosomes from a human male.
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Figure 2- 1 3 Basic concepts: replicated chromosomes are partitioned during mitosis
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S phase mitosis G2 G1 Basic concepts: mitosis segregates sister chromatids to generate daughter cells with identical genomes
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This note was uploaded on 07/17/2011 for the course BIO 151 taught by Professor Grinblat during the Summer '08 term at Wisconsin.

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lec 1 meiosis_posted - Welcome to Genetics 466 Instructors...

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