Week 1 Handout

Week 1 Handout - still be genetically distinct? Explain you...

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Discussion Problems Week 1 Learning objectives: • Describe the change in n and c values as the cell cycle progresses through its phases. • Be able to use the terminology chromosome and chromatid. • Distinguish between meiosis and mitosis. • Explain the significance of meiosis for sexual organisms. The cartoon cell to the right represents a somatic cell from a diploid organism and has 4 chromosomes (haploid number n=2). a) How many chromosomes exist in a cell during G2 phase of the cell cycle? b) How many chromatids exist in a cell during the G2 phase of the cell cycle? c) How many pairs of homologous chromosomes are there in a cell during G1 phase of the cell cycle? d) How many pairs of homologous chromosomes are there in a gamete? e) During meiosis the recombination of chromosomes is important for shuffling the genetic material so the gametes have more genetic diversity. In a mutant with no recombination, could the gametes from one parent
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Unformatted text preview: still be genetically distinct? Explain you answer. Below shows a comparison of mitosis with the two divisions of meiosis. A distinct difference is due to the association of the homologous pairs during metaphase I. This leads to a reductive division where the number of chromosomes is halved. Below shows an alternative result of meiosis for the same cell. Difference is due to the alignment of the homologous pairs during metaphase I. In this case it is possible to have gametes that have DNA wholly from the red or blue parent. Even if there is no recombination it is still possible to get mixing of parental red genes (I m and II ) or blue genes (I p ) in the gametes. The cartoon of meiosis below indicates how the homologous pairs associate during meiosis I. Chromosome Terminology: One chromosome but two sister chromatids after replication of the DNA....
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Week 1 Handout - still be genetically distinct? Explain you...

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