lesson1 - together to put the names of the moon phases in...

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Ashlee Sisson Outline of Lesson When class enters the room at 1:05PM from lunch they will all go to their desks as normal. I will clap to get their attention if needed and ask them to sit on the carpet in front of the “Reading Chair”. I will read “Where Does the Moon Go?” While reading I will ask questions such as, “What is the invisible rubber band called?” or “What do we call the different shapes of the moon?” There will be lots of interaction with the story. Afterwards, I will demonstrate the moons orbit using a baseball. The students will then go to their desks as I pass out a worksheet. The students will complete the worksheet on their own and turn it in for a class work grade. When all papers are turned in I will begin the “Smartboard” activity. I will randomly choose (using name sticks) two students to come up and do the activity together. They will work
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Unformatted text preview: together to put the names of the moon phases in the correct spot. If they work together and cooperate then they will get a ticket. After doing the activity three times I will turn on the video, Phases of the Moon: A Kids Funky Version. Rationale After doing my lesson for the class my host teacher and I met to discuss how it went. She gave me all but positive feedback on my lesson on the moon phases. Although this lesson went very well, she still gave me some tips for my future lessons. She said to make sure my times and schedule are based on my students needs. Also, make sure to always differentiate my lesson in order to teach to various learning styles. The things she said I did well: engaging the class attention, differentiating my instruction, and managing disruptions accordingly....
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This note was uploaded on 07/17/2011 for the course ENGL 241 taught by Professor Wright during the Spring '11 term at George Mason.

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