Tempest Essay

Tempest Essay - A Closer Look into The Tempest By: Ashlee...

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A Closer Look into “The Tempest” By: Ashlee Sisson November 17 th , 2010 McAllister TR 9:30-10:45AM
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Sisson 1 Significance Act 3, Scene 1 of The Tempest shows that Prospero is the main ruler of this island including the people. Ferdinand is given the job that Caliban has as a slave: carrying logs. Ferdinand, being a prince, is not used to this powerful rule over him that Prospero exerts. Although Miranda has been ordered not to speak to Ferdinand or give him her name, she does because she feels that she is in love with him. Since Prospero wants to remain powerful he must first pretend to disapprove of the love between the two, but the audience knows he is happy for them. Being a father, Prospero plays a close to normal modern role in The Tempest since he is simply trying to protect his daughter. Miranda is a young woman in love and wants to help Ferdinand with his work but she also wants to be obedient to her father. This scene is significant because it follows the characters development and explains the social gender roles of this time. Miranda has never seen another woman or man other than her father and Caliban, therefore she has no experience with socializing. When Ferdinand tells her he loves her she does not know how to react. Instead of flirting back or telling him she loves him, too she cries. The development of the relationship between them foreshadows a successful future for the couple. While the two have only known each other for a day their relationship is building quickly as seen solely in this scene. Although this love scene between them is affectionate, Prospero still watches with the need to protect his vulnerable only child. He holds a bit of jealousy inside of him and does not want to see Miranda go. This romantic scene takes place between two other scenes that are more comedic with the characters Caliban, Stefano, and Trinculo. Unlike in the previous scene
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Sisson 2 where the reader sees Caliban cursing while working hard, Ferdinand does it willingly because it serves the woman he loves. Although they are both doing the same work, Caliban is a forced slave to Prospero and Ferdinand is a willing slave to his love. While Caliban curses his work, Ferdinand rejoices. At the end of this scene Miranda proposes to Ferdinand. This is the only scene in The Tempest with interaction between the two as well as an exclusively romantic theme. Before this, Miranda is only shown listening to her father’s every command and the audience does not know who she really is. Shakespeare is now able to confirm that Miranda is actually independent when she disregards her father’s orders to not speak to Ferdinand or give him her name. Miranda offers Ferdinand her heart and hand in marriage and the relationship between the two flourishes. Now, the audience is able to see her as a woman rather than her father’s little girl. Since Prospero stands in the background without interfering, the audience realizes that he is truly happy for his daughter. When he steps forward at the end of the scene he is assuring the audience that
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Tempest Essay - A Closer Look into The Tempest By: Ashlee...

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