Chap019 - Chapter 19 - Scheduling Chapter 19 Scheduling...

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Chapter 19 - Scheduling Chapter 19 Scheduling True / False Questions 1. The textbook underscores the importance of scheduling with the phrase "workflow equals cash flow and scheduling lies at the heart of the process". TRUE Level: Easy 2. A work center is a physical area of the business in which productive resources are organized and work is completed. TRUE Level: Easy 3. A system that "backward schedules" is designed to determine and report the earliest date an order can be completed. FALSE Level: Easy 4. A backward schedule tells when an order must be started in order to be done by a specific date. TRUE Level: Easy 19-1
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Chapter 19 - Scheduling 5. In finite loading no consideration is given directly to whether there is sufficient capacity at the resources required to complete the work, nor is the actual sequence of the work as done by each resource in the work center considered. FALSE Level: Easy 6. In infinite loading no consideration is given directly to whether there is sufficient capacity at the resources required to complete the work, nor is the actual sequence of the work as done by each resource in the work center considered. TRUE Level: Easy 7. Theoretically, all schedules are feasible when finite loading is used. TRUE Level: Easy 8. Initiating performance of scheduled work is commonly termed "dispatching" of orders. TRUE Level: Easy 9. Shop-floor control (or production activity control) can involve reviewing the status and controlling the progress of orders as they are being worked on. TRUE Level: Medium 19-2
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Chapter 19 - Scheduling 10. Shop-floor control (or production activity control) can involve expediting late and critical orders. TRUE Level: Easy 11. In production scheduling the process of determining which job to start first on some machine or in some work center is known as sequencing or priority sequencing. TRUE Level: Easy 12. Priority rules are the rules used to obtain a job sequence in production scheduling. TRUE Level: Easy 13. The FCFS priority rule used in sequencing production jobs will always result in a better solution than the LCFS rule. FALSE Level: Easy 14. Using the random order or "whim" priority rule to sequence production jobs means that supervisors select whichever job they feel like running first. TRUE Level: Easy 19-3
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Chapter 19 - Scheduling 15. Under the STR/OP sequencing priority rule, orders with the jobs with the longest STR/OP are run first. FALSE Level: Easy 16. The LCFS and Johnson's priority rules are basically the same except LCFS uses due dates as a major determiner of job sequence. FALSE Level: Easy 17. Johnson's rule, a priority rule used in sequencing production jobs is used only in production situations where we are dealing with one machine or one stage of production activity. FALSE
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This note was uploaded on 07/17/2011 for the course MBA 587 taught by Professor None during the Spring '11 term at Missouri (Mizzou).

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Chap019 - Chapter 19 - Scheduling Chapter 19 Scheduling...

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