dessler_ch15 - PARTFIVEEMPLOYEERELATIONS CHAPTER Fifteen...

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PART FIVE                                                             EMPLOYEE RELATIONS C H A P T E R F i f t e e n Labor Relations  And Collective Bargaining 15 Lecture Outline 202
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Strategic Overview The Labor Movement A Brief History of the American Union Movement Why do Workers Organize? What do Unions Want? The AFL-CIO Unions and the Law The Norris-LaGuardia and Wagner Acts The Taft-Hartley Act  The Landrum-Griffin Act  The Union Drive and Election Step 1. Initial Contact Step 2. Obtaining Authorization Cards Step 3. Hold a Hearing Step 4. The Campaign Step 5. The Election How to Lose an NLRB Election The Supervisor’s Role Rules Regarding Literature and Solicitation Decertification Elections: Ousting the Union The Collective Bargaining Process What is Collective Bargaining? What is Good Faith? The Negotiating Team Bargaining Items Bargaining Stages Bargaining Hints Impasses, Mediation, and Strikes The Contract Agreement Grievances Sources of Grievances The Grievance Procedure Guidelines for Handling Grievances The Union Movement Today and Tomorrow Why Union Membership Is Down  An Upswing for Unions? Public Employees and Unions Organizing Professionals and White-Collar  Employees New Union Tactics  Employee Participation Programs and Unions In Brief: This chapter gives a brief history of the labor movement, outlines the basics of labor law, and reviews the procedures of labor elections, collective bargaining, and contract administration. The chapter also takes a close look at union tactics in recent years. Interesting Issues: Union membership has declined in the past few decades. However, unions are trying to organize women and minorities, temporary and contingent workers and those in jobs not traditionally unionized. With increasing aggressiveness, unions are targeting multinational companies to unionize workers around the world. ANNOTATED OUTLINE I. The Labor Movement A. A Brief History of the American Union Movement – As early as 1790, skilled craftsmen organized themselves into trade unions, and posted their minimum wage demands to ensure no member accepted a lesser wage. Union membership grew until a major depression around 1837 resulted in a membership decline. Membership increased as the U.S. entered its industrial revolution. In 1869, a group of tailors formed the Knights of Labor. They were interested in political reform and change. After a period of increased 203
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membership, they dissolved in 1893 after several unresolved issues. In 1886, Samuel Gompers formed the Labors (AFL), and its aim was to raise its members’ (mostly skilled workers) day-to-day wages and improve their working conditions. The 1920s was a period of stagnation for the U.S. union movement.
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This note was uploaded on 07/17/2011 for the course MBA 522 taught by Professor None during the Spring '11 term at Missouri (Mizzou).

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dessler_ch15 - PARTFIVEEMPLOYEERELATIONS CHAPTER Fifteen...

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