Ch10 chapter outline - 1 What was the Jeffersonian vision for the United States In what ways could the election of 1800 be considered a

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Unformatted text preview: 1. What was the Jeffersonian vision for the United States? In what ways could the election of 1800 be considered a “revolution”? 2. What precedent did the Supreme Court estab- lish in the Marbury v. Madison case? 3. What challenges and opportunities did Thomas Jefferson face once in office? 4. What challenges and opportunities did James Madison face once in office? 5. Why did the United States declare war on Great Britain in 1812? What were the major turning points of the war? 6. In what ways did the status of white women change in the early Republic? 7. What were the Missouri Compromise, the Monroe Doctrine, and the “corrupt bargain” of 1824? What implications for the future direc- tion of the country did these events carry? Annotated Chapter Outline I. Jefferson Assumes Power, 1800–1801 A. Election by the House 1. The election of 1800 signaled a clear vic- tory for the Republican Party, but voters in the electoral college gave equal numbers of votes to Jefferson and to his running mate, Senator Aaron Burr, an outcome possible because of the single balloting to choose both president and vice president. 2. Because Burr refused to concede the presidency to Jefferson, the election moved to the Federalist-dominated House of Representatives for decision. 3. Anti-Burr Federalist representatives in three states abstained from voting, allow- ing Jefferson the victory without actually having to cast a ballot for him. 4. The election of 1800 demonstrated that the leadership of the nation could shift from one group to a distinctly different one in a peaceful transfer of power effected by ballots, not bullets. B. Gabriel’s Rebellion 1. As the country struggled over its white leadership crisis, a twenty-four-year-old blacksmith named Gabriel plotted his own revolution of 1800 in Virginia. 2. Persistent rumors implicated two white Frenchmen in the plot as well; if that con- nection had been established, it would have strengthened the Federalists’ claims that slave insurrections were a logical outcome of Republican slogans about lib- erty and equality. 3. Gabriel’s revolt never materialized, but it scared Virginia politicians into a serious — but secret — effort to identify a site to which future troublesome slaves could be deported. C. The Jeffersonian Vision of Republican Simplicity 1. Jefferson sidestepped the problem of slavery and turned his attention to establishing a mode of governing that was a clear contrast to that of the Federalists. 2. In office, Jefferson emphasized unfussy frugality. CHAPTER 10 Republicans in Power 1800–1824 Chapter Learning Objectives 79 3. Jefferson’s paramount goal was to scale back the federal exercise of power and pro- mote policies that would foster the inde- pendence of ordinary American citizens....
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This note was uploaded on 07/18/2011 for the course HIST 2111 taught by Professor Winship during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Ch10 chapter outline - 1 What was the Jeffersonian vision for the United States In what ways could the election of 1800 be considered a

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